Drugs Details

Drugs Info of Tenoretic 100, Tenoretic 50
Drugs Details
  • Drugs Type  : Multum
  • Date : 9th Jan 2015 04:15 am
  • Brand Name : Tenoretic 100, Tenoretic 50
  • Generic Name : atenolol and chlorthalidone (Pronunciation: a TEN oh lole and klor THAL i done)
Descriptions

TENORETIC® (atenolol and chlorthalidone) is for the treatment of hypertension. It combines the antihypertensive activity of two agents: a beta1-selective (cardioselective) hydrophilic blocking agent (atenolol, TENORMIN®) and a monosulfonamyl diuretic (chlorthalidone). Atenolol is Benzeneacetamide, 4-[2'-hydroxy-3'-[(1-methylethyl) amino] propoxy]-.

Atenolol structural formula illustration

Atenolol (free base) is a relatively polar hydrophilic compound with a water solubility of 26.5 mg/mL at 37° C. It is freely soluble in 1N HCl (300 mg/mL at 25°C) and less soluble in chloroform (3 mg/mL at 25°C).

Chlorthalidone is 2-Chloro-5-(1-hydroxy-3-oxo-1- isoindolinyl) benzene sulfonamide:

Chlorthalidone structural formula illustration

Chlorthalidone has a water solubility of 12 mg/100 mL at 20°C.

Each TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) 100 Tablet contains:

Atenolol (TENORMIN®).......................................100 mg
Chlorthalidone........................................................25 mg

Each TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) 50 Tablet contains:

Atenolol (TENORMIN®).........................................50 mg
Chlorthalidone..........................................................25 mg

Inactive ingredients: magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, povidone, sodium starch glycolate.

What are the possible side effects of atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic 100, Tenoretic 50)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • fast, slow, or uneven heartbeats;
  • feeling like you might pass out;
  • feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;
  • swelling, rapid weight gain;
  • pale skin, easy...

Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Tenoretic »

What are the precautions when taking atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?

Before taking this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to atenolol or chlorthalidone; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: liver disease, kidney disease, certain types of heart rhythm problems (such as a slow heartbeat, second- or third-degree atrioventricular block), gout, lupus, breathing problems (such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema), blood circulation problems (such as Raynaud's disease, peripheral vascular disease), untreated mineral imbalance (such as low potassium), serious allergic reactions including...

Read All Potential Precautions of Tenoretic »


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Indications

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) is indicated in the treatment of hypertension. This fixed dose combination drug is not indicated for initial therapy of hypertension. If the fixed dose combination represents the dose appropriate to the individual patient'sneeds, it may be more convenient than the separatecomponents.

Dosage Administration

DOSAGE MUST BE INDIVIDUALIZED. (See INDICATIONS.)

Chlorthalidone is usually given at a dose of 25 mg daily; the usual initial dose of atenolol is 50 mg daily. Therefore, the initial dose should be one TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) 50 tablet given once a day. If an optimal response is not achieved, the dosage should be increased to one TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) 100 tablet given once a day.

When necessary, another antihypertensive agent may be added gradually beginning with 50 percent of the usual recommended starting dose to avoid an excessive fall in blood pressure.

Since atenolol is excreted via the kidneys, dosage should be adjusted in cases of severe impairment of renal function. No significant accumulation of atenolol occurs until creatinine clearance falls below 35 mL/min/1.73m2 (normal range is 100-150 mL/min/1.73m2); therefore, the following maximum dosages are recommended for patients with renal impairment. Creatinine Clearance Atenolol Elimination (mL/min/1.73m2) Half-life (hrs) Maximum Dosage15-35 16-27 50 mg daily < 15 > 27 50 mg every other day

How Supplied

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) 50 Tablets (atenolol 50 mg and chlorthalidone 25 mg), NDC 0310-0115, (white, round, biconvex, uncoated tablets with TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) on one side and 115 on the other side, bisected) are supplied in bottles of 100 tablets.

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) 100 Tablets (atenolol 100 mg and chlorthalidone 25 mg), NDC 0310-0117, (white, round, biconvex, uncoated tablets with TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) on one side and 117 on the other side) are supplied in bottles of 100 tablets.

Storage

Store at controlled room temperature, 20-25°C (68-77°F) [see USP]. Dispense in well-closed, light-resistant containers.

Manufactured for: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Wilmington, DE 19850. By: IPR Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Carolina, PR 00984. Rev 02/05. FDA Rev date: 10/29/2008


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Side Effects

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) is usually well tolerated in properly selected patients. Most adverse effects have been mild and transient.The adverse effects observed for TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) are essentially the same as those seen with the individual components.

Atenolol

The frequency estimates in the following table were derived from controlled studies in which adverse reactions were either volunteered by the patient (US studies) or elicited, eg, by checklist (foreign studies). The reported frequency of elicited adverse effects was higher for both atenolol and placebo treated patients than when these reactions were volunteered. Where frequency of adverse effects for atenolol and placebo is similar, causal relationship to atenolol is uncertain.

  Volunteered (US Studies) Total-Volunteered and Elicited (Foreign + US Studies)
Atenolol
(n = 164)
%
Placebo
(n = 206)
%
Atenolol
(n = 399)
%
Placebo
(n = 407)
%
CARDIOVASCULAR
Bradycardia 3 0 3 0
Cold Extremities 0 0.5 12 5
Postural Hypotension 2 1 4 5
Leg Pain 0 0.5 3 1
CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM/ NEUROMUSCULAR
Dizziness 4 1 13 6
Vertigo 2 0.5 2 0.2
Light-Headedness 1 0 3 0.7
Tiredness 0.6 0.5 26 13
Fatigue 3 1 6 5
Lethargy 1 0 3 0.7
Drowsiness 0.6 0 2 0.5
Depression 0.6 0.5 12 9
Dreaming 0 0 3 1
GASTROINTESTINAL
Diarrhea 2 0 3 2
Nausea 4 1 3 1
RESPIRATORY (see WARNINGS)
Wheeziness 0 0 3 3
Dyspnea 0.6 1 6 4

During postmarketing experience, the following have been reported in temporal relationship to the use of the drug: elevated liver enzymes and/or bilirubin, hallucinations, headache, impotence, Peyronie's disease, postural hypotension which may be associated with syncope, psoriasiform rash or exacerbation of psoriasis, psychoses, purpura, reversible alopecia, thrombocytopenia, visual disturbance, sick sinus syndrome, and dry mouth. TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) , like other beta blockers, has been associated with the development of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), lupus syndrome, and Raynaud's

Chlorthalidone

Cardiovascular: orthostatic hypotension; Gastrointestinal: anorexia, gastric irritation, vomiting, cramping, constipation, jaundice (intrahepatic cholestatic jaundice), pancreatitis; CNS: vertigo, paresthesia, xanthopsia; Hematologic: leukopenia, agranulocytosis, thrombocytopenia, aplastic anemia; Hypersensitivity: purpura, photosensitivity, rash, urticaria, necrotizing angiitis (vasculitis) (cutaneous vasculitis), Lyell's syndrome (toxic epidermal necrolysis); Miscellaneous: hyperglycemia, glycosuria, hyperuricemia, muscle spasm, weakness, restlessness. Clinical trials of TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) conducted in the United States (89 patients treated with TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) ) revealed no new or unexpected adverse effects.

Potential Adverse Effects

In addition, a variety of adverse effects not observed in clinical trials with atenolol but reported with other beta-adrenergic blocking agents should be considered potential adverse effects of atenolol. Nervous System: Reversible mental depression progressing to catatonia; an acute reversible syndrome characterized by disorientation for time and place, short-term memory loss, emotional lability, slightly clouded sensorium, decreased performance on neuropsychometrics; Cardiovascular: Intensification of AV block (see CONTRAINDICATIONS); Gastrointestinal: Mesenteric arterial thrombosis, ischemic colitis; Hematologic: Agranulocytosis; Allergic: Erythematous rash, fevercombined with aching and sore throat, laryngospasm and respiratory distress.

Miscellaneous

There have been reports of skin rashes and/or dry eyes associated with the use of beta-adrenergic blocking drugs. The reported incidence is small, and, in most cases, the symptoms have cleared when treatment was withdrawn. Discontinuance of the drug should be considered if any such reaction is not otherwise explicable. Patients should be closely monitored following cessation of therapy. (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION.)

The oculomucocutaneous syndrome associated with the beta blocker practolol has not been reported with atenolol (TENORMIN). Furthermore, a number of patients who had previously demonstrated established practolol reactions were transferred to atenolol (TENORMIN) therapy with subsequent resolution or quiescence of the reaction.

Clinical Laboratory Test Findings

Clinically important changes in standard laboratory parameters were rarely associated with the administration of TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) . The changes in laboratory parameters were notprogressive and usually were not associated with clinical manifestations. The most common changes were increases inuric acid and decreases in serum potassium.

Read the Tenoretic (atenolol and chlorthalidone) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Interactions

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) may potentiate the action of other antihypertensive agents used concomitantly. Patients treatedwith TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) plus a catecholamine depletor (eg, reserpine) should be closely observed for evidence of hypotension and/or marked bradycardia which may produce vertigo, syncope or postural hypotension.

Calcium channel blockers may also have an additive effect when given with TENORETIC. (See WARNINGS.)

Class I anti-arrhythmic drugs (e.g. disopyramide) and amiodarone may have potentiating effect on atrial-conduction time and induce negative inotropic effect. Disopyramide is a Type I antiarrhythmic drug with potent negative inotropic and chronotropic effects.

Disopyramide has been associated with severe bradycardia, asystole and heart failure when administered with beta blockers. Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic agent with negative chronotropic properties that may be additive to those seen with beta blockers.

Thiazides may decrease arterial responsiveness to norepinephrine. This diminution is not sufficient to preclude the therapeutic effectiveness of norepinephrine. Thiazides may increase the responsiveness to tubocurarine.

Concomitant use of prostaglandin synthase inhibiting drugs, eg, indomethacin, may decrease the hypotensive effects of beta blockers.

Lithium generally should not be given with diuretics because they reduce its renal clearance and add a high risk of lithium toxicity. Read prescribing information for lithium preparations before use of such preparations with TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) .

Beta blockers may exacerbate the rebound hypertension which can follow the withdrawal of clonidine. If the two drugs are coadministered, the beta blocker should be withdrawn several days before the gradual withdrawal of clonidine. If replacing clonidine by beta-blocker therapy, the introduction of beta blockers should be delayed for several days after clonidine administration has stopped.

While taking beta blockers, patients with a history of anaphylactic reaction to a variety of allergens may have a more severe reaction on repeated challenge, either accidental, diagnostic or therapeutic. Such patients may be unresponsive to the usual doses of epinephrine used to treat the allergic reaction.

Both digitalis glycosides and beta-blockers slow atrioventricular conduction and decrease heart rate.

Concomitant use can increase the risk of bradycardia.

Other Precautions

In patients receiving thiazides, sensitivity reactions may occurwith or without a history of allergy or bronchial asthma. The possible exacerbation or activation of systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported. The antihypertensive effects of thiazides may be enhanced in the postsympathectomy patient.

Read the Tenoretic Drug Interactions Center for a complete guide to possible interactions

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This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Warnings

Cardiac Failure

Sympathetic stimulation is necessary in supporting circulatory function in congestive heart failure, and beta blockade carries the potential hazard of further depressing myocardial contractility and precipitating more severe failure. In patients who have congestive heart failure controlled by digitalis and/or diuretics, TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) should be administered cautiously. Both digitalis and atenolol slow AV conduction.

IN PATIENTS WITHOUT A HISTORY OF CARDIAC FAILURE, continued depression of the myocardium with beta-blocking agents over a period of time can, in some cases, lead to cardiac failure. At the first sign or symptom of impending cardiac failure, patients should be treated appropriately according to currently recommended guidelines, and the response observed closely. If cardiac failure continues despite adequate treatment, TENORETIC should be withdrawn. (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION.)

Renal and Hepatic Disease and ElectrolyteDisturbances

Since atenolol is excreted via the kidneys, TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) should be used with caution in patients with impaired renal function.

In patients with renal disease, thiazides may precipitate azotemia. Since cumulative effects may develop in the presence of impaired renal function, if progressive renal impairment becomes evident, TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) should be discontinued.

In patients with impaired hepatic function or progressive liver disease, minor alterations in fluid and electrolyte balance may precipitate hepatic coma. TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) should be used with caution in these patients.

Ischemic Heart Disease

Following abrupt cessation of therapy with certain beta-blocking agents in patients with coronary artery disease, exacerbations of angina pectoris and, in some cases, myocardial infarction have been reported. Therefore, such patients should be cautioned against interruption of therapy without the physician's advice. Even in the absence of overt angina pectoris, when discontinuation of TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) is planned, the patient should be carefully observed and should be advised to limit physical activity to a minimum.

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) should be reinstated if withdrawal symptoms occur. Because coronary artery disease is common and may be unrecognized, it may be prudent not to discontinue TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) therapy abruptly even in patients treated only for hypertension.

Concomitant Use of Calcium Channel Blockers

Bradycardia and heart block can occur and the left ventricular end diastolic pressure can rise when beta-blockers are administered with verapamil or diltiazem. Patients with preexisting conduction abnormalities or left ventricular dysfunction are particularly susceptible. (See PRECAUTIONS.)

Bronchospastic Diseases

PATIENTS WITH BRONCHOSPASTIC DISEASE SHOULD, IN GENERAL, NOT RECEIVE BETABLOCKERS. Because of its relative beta1-selectivity, however, TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) may be used with caution in patients with bronchospastic disease who do not respond to or cannot tolerate, other antihypertensive treatment. Since beta1-selectivity is not absolute, the lowest possibledose of TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) should be used and a beta2-stimulating agent (bronchodilator) should be made available. If dosage must be increased, dividing the dose should be considered in order to achieve lower peak blood levels.

Anesthesia and Major Surgery

It is not advisable to withdraw beta-adrenoreceptor blockingdrugs prior to surgery in the majority of patients. However,care should be taken when using anesthetic agents such as those which may depress the myocardium. Vagal dominance, if it occurs, may be corrected with atropine (1-2 mg IV). Beta blockers are competitive inhibitors of beta-receptor agonists and their effects on the heart can be reversed by administration of such agents; eg, dobutamine or isoproterenol with caution (see section on OVERDOSAGE).

Metabolic and Endocrine Effects

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) may be used with caution in diabetic patients. Beta blockers may mask tachycardia occurring with hypoglycemia, but other manifestations such as dizziness and sweating may not be significantly affected. At recommended doses atenolol does not potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and, unlike nonselective beta blockers, does not delay recovery of blood glucose to normal levels.

Insulin requirements in diabetic patients may be increased, decreased or unchanged; latent diabetes mellitus may become manifest during chlorthalidone administration.

Beta-adrenergic blockade may mask certain clinical signs (eg, tachycardia) of hyperthyroidism. Abrupt withdrawal of beta blockade might precipitate a thyroid storm; therefore, patients suspected of developing thyrotoxicosis from whom TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) therapy is to be withdrawn should be monitored closely.

Because calcium excretion is decreased by thiazides, TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) should be discontinued before carrying out tests for parathyroid function. Pathologic changes in the parathyroid glands, with hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia, have been observed in a few patients on prolonged thiazide therapy; however, the common complications of hyperparathyroidism such as renal lithiasis, bone resorption, and peptic ulceration have not been seen. Hyperuricemia may occur, or acute gout may be precipitated in certain patients receiving thiazide therapy.

Untreated Pheochromocytoma

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) should not be given to patients with untreated pheochromocytoma.

Pregnancy and Fetal Injury

Atenolol can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Atenolol crosses the placental barrier and appears in cord blood. Administration of atenolol, starting in the second trimester of pregnancy, has been associated with the birth of infants that are small for gestational age. No studies have been performed on the use of atenolol in the first trimester and the possibility of fetal injury cannot be excluded. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus.

Neonates born to mothers who are receiving atenolol at parturition or breast-feeding may be at risk for hypoglycemia and bradycardia. Caution should be exercised when TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) is administered during pregnancy or to a woman who is breast-feeding. (See PRECAUTIONS, Nursing Mothers.)

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) was studied for teratogenic potential in the rat and rabbit. Doses of atenolol/chlorthalidone of 8/2, 80/20, and 240/60 mg/kg/day were administered orally to pregnant rats with no evidence of embryofetotoxicity observed. Two studies were conducted in rabbits. In the first study, pregnant rabbits were dosed with 8/2, 80/20, and 160/40 mg/kg/day of atenolol/chlorthalidone. No teratogenic effects were noted, but embryonic resorptions were observed at all dose levels (ranging from approximately 5 times to 100 times the maximum recommended human dose*). In the second rabbit study, doses of atenolol/chlorthalidone were 4/1, 8/2, and 20/5 mg/kg/day. No teratogenic or embryotoxic effects were demonstrated.

Atenolol

Atenolol has been shown to produce a dose-related increase in embryo/fetal resorptions in rats at doses equal to or greater than 50 mg/kg/day or 25 or more times the maximum recommended human antihypertensive dose.* Although similar effects were not seen in rabbits, the compound was not evaluated in rabbits at doses above 25 mg/kg/day or 12.5 times the maximum recommended human antihypertensive dose.*

Chlorthalidone

Thiazides cross the placental barrier and appear in cord blood. The use of chlorthalidone and related drugs in pregnant women requires that the anticipated benefits of the drug be weighed against possible hazards to the fetus. These hazards include fetal or neonatal jaundice, thrombocytopenia and possibly other adverse reactions which have occurred in the adult.

*Based on the maximum dose of 100 mg/day in a 50 kg patient.

Precautions

General

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) may aggravate peripheral arterial circulatory disorders.

Electrolyte and Fluid Balance Status

Periodic determination of serum electrolytes to detect possible electrolyte imbalance should be performed at appropriate intervals.

Patients should be observed for clinical signs of fluid or electrolyte imbalance; i.e., hyponatremia, hypochloremic alkalosis, and hypokalemia. Serum and urine electrolyte determinations are particularly important when the patient is vomiting excessively or receiving parenteral fluids. Warning signs or symptoms of fluid and electrolyte imbalance include dryness of the mouth, thirst, weakness, lethargy, drowsiness, restlessness, muscle pains or cramps, muscular fatigue, hypotension, oliguria, tachycardia, and gastrointestinal disturbances such as nausea and vomiting.

Measurement of potassium levels is appropriate especially in elderly patients, those receiving digitalis preparations for cardiac failure, patients whose dietary intake of potassium is abnormally low, or those suffering from gastrointestinal complaints.

Hypokalemia may develop especially with brisk diuresis, when severe cirrhosis is present, or during concomitant use of corticosteroids or ACTH.

Interference with adequate oral electrolyte intake will also contribute to hypokalemia. Hypokalemia can sensitize or exaggerate the response of the heart to the toxic effects of digitalis (eg, increased ventricular irritability). Hypokalemia may be avoided or treated by use of potassium supplements or foods with a high potassium content.

Any chloride deficit during thiazide therapy is generally mild and usually does not require specific treatment except under extraordinary circumstances (as in liver disease or renaldisease). Dilutional hyponatremia may occur in edematous patients in hot weather; appropriate therapy is water restriction rather than administration of salt except in rare instances when the hyponatremia is life-threatening. In actual salt depletion, appropriate replacement is the therapy of choice.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Two long-term (maximum dosing duration of 18 or 24 months) rat studies and one long-term (maximum dosing duration of 18 months) mouse study, each employing dose levels as high as 300 mg/kg/day or 150 times the maximum recommended human antihypertensive dose*, did not indicate a carcinogenic potential of atenolol. A third (24 month) rat study, employing doses of 500 and 1,500 mg/kg/day (250 and 750 times the maximum recommended human antihypertensive dose*) resulted in increased incidences of benign adrenal medullary tumors in males and females, mammary fibroadenomas in females, and anterior pituitary adenomas and thyroid parafollicular cell carcinomas in males. No evidence of a mutagenic potential of atenolol was *Based on the maximum dose of 100 mg/day in a 50 kg patient. 14 uncovered in the dominant lethal test (mouse), in vivo cytogenetics test (Chinese hamster) or Ames test (S typhimurium).

Fertility of male or female rats (evaluated at dose levels as high as 200 mg/kg/day or 100 times the maximum recommended human dose*) was unaffected by atenolol administration.

Animal Toxicology

Six month oral administration studies were conducted in rats and dogs using TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) doses up to 12.5 mg/kg/day (atenolol/chlorthalidone 10/2.5 mg/kg/day -- approximately five times the maximum recommended human antihypertensive dose*). There were no functional or morphological abnormalities resulting from dosing either compound alone or together other than minor changes in heart rate, blood pressure and urine chemistry which were attributed to the known pharmacologic properties of atenolol and/or chlorthalidone.

Chronic studies of atenolol performed in animals have revealed the occurrence of vacuolation of epithelial cells of Brunner's glands in the duodenum of both male and female dogs at all tested dose levels (starting at 15 mg/kg/day or 7.5 times the maximum recommended human antihypertensive dose*) and increased incidence of atrial degeneration of hearts of male rats at 300 but not 150 mg atenolol/kg/day (150 and 75 times the maximum recommended human antihypertensive dose,* respectively).

Use in Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category D

See WARNINGS - Pregnancy and Fetal Injury.

Nursing Mothers

Atenolol is excreted in human breast milk at a ratio of 1.5 to6.8 when compared to the concentration in plasma. Caution should be exercised when atenolol is administered to a nursing woman. Clinically significant bradycardia has been reported in breast-fed infants. Premature infants, or infants with impaired renal function, may be more likely to develop adverse effects.

Neonates born to mothers who are receiving atenolol at parturition or breast-feeding may be at risk for hypoglycemia and bradycardia. Caution should be exercised when TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) is administered during pregnancy or to a woman who is breast-feeding. (See WARNINGS, Pregnancy and Fetal Injury.)

*Based on the maximum dose of 100 mg/day in a 50 kg patient.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences inresponses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and concomitant disease or other drug therapy.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

OverDose

No specific information is available with regard to overdosageand TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) in humans. Treatment should be symptomatic and supportive and directed to the removal of any unabsorbed drug by induced emesis, or administration of activated charcoal. Atenolol can be removed from the general circulation by hemodialysis. Further consideration should be given to dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and hypotension by established procedures.

Atenolol

Overdosage with atenolol has been reported with patients surviving acute doses as high as 5 g. One death was reported in a man who may have taken as much as 10 g acutely. The predominant symptoms reported following atenolol overdose are lethargy, disorder of respiratory drive, wheezing,sinus pause, and bradycardia. Additionally, common effects associated with overdosage of any beta-adrenergic blocking agent are congestive heart failure, hypotension, bronchospasm, and/or hypoglycemia. Other treatmentmodalities should be employed at the physician's discretion and may include:

BRADYCARDIA: Atropine 1-2 mg intravenously. If there is no response to vagal blockade, give isoproterenol cautiously. In refractory cases, a transvenous cardiac pacemaker may be indicated. Glucagon in a 10 mg intravenous bolus has been reported to be useful. If required, this may be repeated or followed by an intravenous infusion of glucagon 1-10 mg/h depending on response.

HEART BLOCK (SECOND OR THIRD DEGREE): Isoproterenol or transvenous pacemaker.

CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: Digitalize the patient and administer a diuretic. Glucagon has been reported to be useful.

HYPOTENSION: Vasopressors such as dopamine or norepinephrine (levarterenol). Monitor blood pressure continuously.

BRONCHOSPASM: A beta2-stimulant such as isoproterenol or terbutaline and/or aminophylline.

HYPOGLYCEMIA: Intravenous glucose.

ELECTROLYTE DISTURBANCE: Monitor electrolyte levels and renal function. Institute measures to maintain hydration and electrolytes.

Based on the severity of symptoms, management may requireintensive support care and facilities for applying cardiac and respiratory support.

Chlorthalidone

Symptoms of chlorthalidone overdose include nausea, weakness, dizziness and disturbances of electrolyte balance.

ContrainDications

TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) is contraindicated in patients with: sinus bradycardia; heart block greater than first degree; cardiogenic shock; overt cardiac failure (see WARNINGS); anuria; hypersensitivity to this product or to sulfonamide-derived drugs.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Clinical Pharamacology

Tenoretic (atenolol and chlorthalidone) Atenolol and chlorthalidone have been used singly and concomitantly for the treatment of hypertension. The antihypertensive effects of these agents are additive, and studies have shown that there is no interference with bioavailability when these agents are given together in the single combination tablet. Therefore, this combination provides a convenient formulation for the concomitant administration of these two entities. In patients with more severe hypertension, TENORETIC (atenolol and chlorthalidone) may be administered with other antihypertensives such as vasodilators.

Atenolol

Atenolol is a beta1-selective (cardioselective) beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agent without membrane stabilizing or intrinsic sympathomimetic (partial agonist) activities. This preferential effect is not absolute, however, and at higher doses, atenolol inhibits beta2-adrenoreceptors, chiefly located in the bronchial and vascular musculature.

Pharmacodynamics

In standard animal or human pharmacological tests, beta-adrenoreceptor blocking activity of atenolol has been demonstrated by: (1) reduction in resting and exercise heartrates and cardiac output, (2) reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure at rest and on exercise, (3) inhibition of isoproterenol induced tachycardia and (4) reduction in reflexorthostatic tachycardia.

A significant beta-blocking effect of atenolol, as measured by reduction of exercise tachycardia, is apparent within one hour following oral administration of a single dose. This effect ismaximal at about 2 to 4 hours and persists for at least 24 hours. The effect at 24 hours is dose related and also bears a linear relationship to the logarithm of plasma atenolol concentration. However, as has been shown for all beta blocking agents, the antihypertensive effect does not appear to be related to plasma level.

In normal subjects, the beta1-selectivity of atenolol has been shown by its reduced ability to reverse the beta2-mediated vasodilating effect of isoproterenol as compared to equivalent beta-blocking doses of propranolol. In asthmatic patients, adose of atenolol producing a greater effect on resting heart rate than propranolol resulted in much less increase in airway resistance. In a placebo controlled comparison of approximately equipotent oral doses of several beta blockers, atenolol produced a significantly smaller decrease of FEV1 than nonselective beta blockers, such as propranolol and unlike those agents did not inhibit bronchodilation in response to isoproterenol.

Consistent with its negative chronotropic effect due to beta blockade of the SA node, atenolol increases sinus cycle lengthand sinus node recovery time. Conduction in the AV node is also prolonged. Atenolol is devoid of membrane stabilizing activity, and increasing the dose well beyond that producing beta blockade does not further depress myocardial contractility. Several studies have demonstrated a moderate (approximately 10%) increase in stroke volume at rest and exercise.

In controlled clinical trials, atenolol given as a single daily dose, was an effective antihypertensive agent providing 24-hour reduction of blood pressure. Atenolol has been studied in combination with thiazide-type diuretics and theblood pressure effects of the combination are approximately additive. Atenolol is also compatible with methyldopa, hydralazine and prazosin, the combination resulting in a larger fall in blood pressure than with the single agents. The dose range of atenolol is narrow, and increasing the dose beyond 100 mg once daily is not associated with increased antihypertensive effect. The mechanisms of the antihypertensive effects of beta-blocking agents have not been established. Several mechanisms have been proposed and include: (1) competitive antagonism of catecholamines at peripheral (especially cardiac) adrenergic neuron sites, leading to decreased cardiac output, (2) a central effect leading to reduced sympathetic outflow to the periphery and (3) suppression of renin activity. The results from long-term studies have not shown any diminution of the antihypertensive efficacy of atenolol with prolonged use.

Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism

In man, absorption of an oral dose is rapid and consistent but incomplete. Approximately 50% of an oral dose is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, the remainder being excreted unchanged in the feces. Peak blood levels are reached between 2 and 4 hours after ingestion. Unlike propranolol or metoprolol, but like nadolol, hydrophilic atenolol undergoes little or no metabolism by the liver, and the absorbed portion is eliminated primarily by renal excretion. Atenolol also differs from propranolol in that only a small amount (6 - 16%) is bound to proteins in the plasma. This kinetic profile results in relatively consistent plasma drug levels with about a fourfold interpatient variation. There is no information as to the pharmacokinetic effect of atenolol on chlorthalidone. The elimination half-life of atenolol is approximately 6 to 7 hours and there is no alteration of the kinetic profile of the drug by chronic administration. Following doses of 50 mg or 100 mg, both beta-blocking and antihypertensive effects persist for at least 24 hours. When renal function is impaired, elimination of atenolol is closely related to the glomerular filtration rate; but significant accumulation does not occuruntil the creatinine clearance falls below 35 mL/min/1.73m2 (see prescribing information for atenolol [TENORMIN®]).

Atenolol Geriatric Pharmacology

In general, elderly patients present higher atenolol plasma levels with total clearance values about 50% lower than younger subjects. The half-life is markedly longer in the elderly compared to younger subjects. The reduction of atenolol clearance follows the general trend that the elimination of renally excreted drugs is decreased with increasing age.

Chlorthalidone

Chlorthalidone is a monosulfonamyl diuretic which differs chemically from thiazide diuretics in that a double ring system is incorporated in its structure. It is an oral diuretic with prolonged action and low toxicity. The diuretic effect of the drug occurs within 2 hours of an oral dose. It produces diuresis with greatly increased excretion of sodium and chloride. At maximal therapeutic dosage, chlorthalidone is approximately equal in its diuretic effect to comparable maximal therapeutic doses of benzothiadiazine diuretics. The site of action appears to be the cortical diluting segment of the ascending limb of Henle's loop of the nephron.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Patient Information

No information provided. Please refer to the WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS sections.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Consumer Overview Uses

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

 

ATENOLOL/CHLORTHALIDONE - ORAL

 

(a-TEN-oh-lol/klor-THAL-i-done)

 

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Tenoretic

 

WARNING: Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Some conditions may become worse when you suddenly stop this drug. Some people who have suddenly stopped taking similar drugs have had chest pain, heart attack, and irregular heartbeat. If your doctor decides you should no longer use this drug, he or she may direct you to gradually decrease your dose over 1 to 2 weeks.

When gradually stopping this medication, it is recommended that you temporarily limit physical activity to decrease strain on the heart. Get medical help right away if you develop chest pain/tightness/pressure, chest pain spreading to the jaw/neck/arm, unusual sweating, trouble breathing, or fast/irregular heartbeat.

 

USES: This medication is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). Lowering high blood pressure helps prevent strokes, heart attacks, and kidney problems. This product contains 2 medications: atenolol and chlorthalidone. Atenolol belongs to a class of drugs known as beta blockers. It works by blocking the action of certain natural chemicals in your body, such as epinephrine, on the heart and blood vessels. This effect lowers the heart rate, blood pressure, and strain on the heart. Chlorthalidone is a "water pill" (diuretic) and causes your body to get rid of extra salt and water. This effect may increase the amount of urine you make when you first start the medication. It also helps to relax the blood vessels so that blood can flow more easily.

These medications are used together when 1 drug alone is not controlling your blood pressure. Your doctor may direct you to start taking the individual medications first, and then switch you over to this combination product if this is the best dose combination for you.

 

HOW TO USE: See also Warning section.

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually once daily. If you take this drug too close to bedtime, you may need to wake up to urinate. Therefore, it is best to take this medication at least 4 hours before your bedtime. Consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions about your dosing schedule.

Apple juice and orange juice may prevent your body from fully absorbing atenolol. It is best to avoid drinking apple/orange juice within 4 hours of taking this medication.

The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day.

If you also take certain drugs to lower your cholesterol (bile acid-binding resins such as cholestyramine or colestipol), take this product at least 2 hours before or at least 4 hours after these medications.

It may take several weeks before you get the full benefit of this medication. It is important to continue taking this medication even if you feel well. Most people with high blood pressure do not feel sick.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens (for example, your routine blood pressure readings remain high or increase).

Consumer Overview Side Effect

SIDE EFFECTS: See also Warning and Precautions sections.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, tiredness, nausea, and diarrhea may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position.

This product may reduce blood flow to your hands and feet, causing them to feel cold. Smoking may worsen this effect. Dress warmly and avoid tobacco use.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

The chlorthalidone in this product may cause a loss of too much body water (dehydration) and salt/minerals. Tell your doctor right away if you have any symptoms of dehydration or mineral loss, including: extreme thirst, very dry mouth, muscle cramps, weakness, fast/irregular heartbeat, confusion.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: very slow heartbeat, fainting, trouble breathing, change in the amount of urine (not including the normal increase in urine when you first start this drug), toe/joint pain, mental/mood changes (such as depression, mood swings), blue fingers/toes, new or worsening symptoms of heart failure (such as swelling ankles/feet, severe tiredness, shortness of breath, unexplained/sudden weight gain).

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

 

Read the Tenoretic (atenolol and chlorthalidone) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Learn More »

PRECAUTIONS: Before taking this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to atenolol or chlorthalidone; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: liver disease, kidney disease, certain types of heart rhythm problems (such as a slow heartbeat, second- or third-degree atrioventricular block), gout, lupus, breathing problems (such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema), blood circulation problems (such as Raynaud's disease, peripheral vascular disease), untreated mineral imbalance (such as low potassium), serious allergic reactions including those needing treatment with epinephrine, a certain muscle/nerve disease (myasthenia gravis).

This drug may make you dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Limit alcoholic beverages.

Too much sweating, diarrhea, or vomiting may cause loss of too much body water (dehydration) and increase your risk of dizziness or lightheadedness. Report prolonged diarrhea or vomiting to your doctor. Be sure to drink enough fluids to prevent dehydration unless your doctor directs you otherwise.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

This medication may reduce the potassium levels in your blood. Ask your doctor about adding potassium to your diet. Your doctor may prescribe a potassium supplement.

If you have diabetes, this product may prevent the fast/pounding heartbeat you would usually feel when your blood sugar level falls too low (hypoglycemia). Other symptoms of low blood sugar, such as dizziness and sweating, are unaffected by this drug. This product may also make it harder to control your blood sugar levels. Check your blood sugar levels regularly as directed by your doctor. Tell your doctor immediately if you have symptoms of high blood sugar such as increased thirst/urination. Your doctor may need to adjust your diabetes medication, exercise program, or diet.

This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Avoid prolonged sun exposure, tanning booths, and sunlamps. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially dizziness.

This medication is not recommended for use during pregnancy. It may harm an unborn baby. Consult your doctor for more details.

Atenolol and chlorthalidone pass into breast milk. Atenolol may harm a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Consumer Overview Missed Dose

DRUG INTERACTIONS: See also How to Use section.

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: cisapride, fingolimod, lithium.

Check the labels on all your medicines (such as cough-and-cold products, diet aids, or NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen) because they may contain ingredients that could increase your blood pressure or heart rate. Ask your pharmacist for more details.

This product may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including parathyroid, protein-bound iodide), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

 

OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: severe dizziness, fainting, very slow heartbeat, trouble breathing.

 

NOTES: Do not share this medication with others.

Lifestyle changes that may help this medication work better include stress reduction programs, exercise, and dietary changes. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about lifestyle changes that might benefit you.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (including kidney function, blood mineral levels such as potassium) should be performed regularly to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

Have your blood pressure and heart rate checked regularly while taking this medication. Learn how to check your own blood pressure and heart rate at home, and share the results with your doctor.

 

MISSED DOSE: If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

 

STORAGE: Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

 

Information last revised June 2013. Copyright(c) 2013 First Databank, Inc.

Patient Detailed Side Effect

Brand Names: Tenoretic 100, Tenoretic 50

Generic Name: atenolol and chlorthalidone (Pronunciation: a TEN oh lole and klor THAL i done)

  • What is atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?
  • What are the possible side effects of atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?
  • How should I take atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (Tenoretic)?
  • What happens if I overdose (Tenoretic)?
  • What should I avoid while taking atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?
  • What other drugs will affect atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?
  • Where can I get more information?

What is atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?

Atenolol is in a group of drugs called beta-blockers. Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins).

Chlorthalidone is a thiazide diuretic (water pill) that helps prevent your body from absorbing too much salt, which can cause fluid retention.

The combination of atenolol and chlorthalidone is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure).

Atenolol and chlorthalidone may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Atenolol-Chlorthalidone 100 mg-25 mg-MUT

round, white, imprinted with MP 152

What are the possible side effects of atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • fast, slow, or uneven heartbeats;
  • feeling like you might pass out;
  • feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;
  • swelling, rapid weight gain;
  • pale skin, easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin, trouble concentrating;
  • confusion, hallucinations, seizure (convulsions);
  • cold feeling in your hands and feet;
  • nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • dry mouth, extreme thirst, drowsiness, restless feeling, nausea, vomiting, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle pain or weakness, fainting; or
  • memory problems, weakness, loss of appetite, feeling unsteady, shallow breathing or breathing that stops.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • dizziness, spinning sensation;
  • tired feeling;
  • diarrhea, constipation, upset stomach;
  • headache;
  • mild itching or skin rash; or
  • impotence, loss of interest in sex, or trouble having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Tenoretic (atenolol and chlorthalidone) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Learn More »

What is the most important information I should know about atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?

Do not use atenolol and chlorthalidone if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to atenolol (Tenormin) or chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), or if you have a serious heart problem such as heart block or slow heart rate, if you are unable to urinate, or if you are allergic to sulfa drugs (such as Bactrim, Septra, Sulfatrim, SMX-TMP, and others).

Before you take atenolol and chlorthalidone, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure, angina (chest pain), liver or kidney disease, a lung disorder, diabetes, gout, lupus, a thyroid disorder, adrenal gland tumor, psoriasis, or circulation problems.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using atenolol and chlorthalidone.

Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse.

If you do stop taking this medication for any reason, limit your physical activity to prevent heart problems. Your doctor may recommend that you start taking the medication again if you have withdrawal symptoms.

Atenolol and chlorthalidone is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Side Effects Centers
  • Tenoretic

Patient Detailed How Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to atenolol (Tenormin) or chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), or if you have:

  • a serious heart problem such as heart block, or slow heart rate;
  • if you are unable to urinate; or
  • if you are allergic to sulfa drugs (such as Bactrim, Septra, Sulfatrim, SMX-TMP, and others).

To make sure you can safely take atenolol and chlorthalidone, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • congestive heart failure;
  • circulation problems;
  • angina (chest pain);
  • liver or kidney disease;
  • asthma, bronchitis, or other lung disorder;
  • diabetes;
  • gout;
  • lupus;
  • a thyroid disorder;
  • psoriasis; or
  • adrenal gland tumor (also called pheochromocytoma).

FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use atenolol and chlorthalidone if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. Use effective birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

Atenolol and chlorthalidone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with food if it upsets your stomach.

Atenolol and chlorthalidone is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using atenolol and chlorthalidone. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Call your doctor if you have ongoing vomiting or diarrhea, or if you are sweating more than usual. You can easily become dehydrated while taking this medication, which can lead to severely low blood pressure or a serious electrolyte imbalance.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using atenolol and chlorthalidone.

Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse.

If you do stop taking this medication for any reason, limit your physical activity to prevent heart problems. Your doctor may recommend that you start taking the medication again if you have withdrawal symptoms.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Side Effects Centers
  • Tenoretic

Patient Detailed Avoid Taking

What happens if I miss a dose (Tenoretic)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose (Tenoretic)?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme tiredness, trouble breathing, wheezing, slow heart rate, chest pain, swelling, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink. In some cases, drinking too much liquid can be as unsafe as not drinking enough.

What other drugs will affect atenolol and chlorthalidone (Tenoretic)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you are using, especially:

  • other blood pressure medications, especially clonidine (Catapres), (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), nisoldipine (Sular), reserpine (Serpasil), or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan);
  • digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);
  • dobutamine (Dobutrex);
  • indomethacin (Indocin);
  • isoproterenol (Isuprel Mistometer);
  • lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid);
  • a diabetes medication such as insulin, glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase, Glynase), glipizide (Glucotrol), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), or metformin (Glucophage);
  • heart rhythm medication such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) or disopyramide (Norpace);
  • a diuretic (water pill) such as chlorothiazide (Diuril), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Lopressor, Vasoretic, Zestoretic), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), and others; or
  • steroid medications (prednisone and others).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with atenolol and chlorthalidone. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about atenolol and chlorthalidone.


Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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