Drugs Details

Drugs Info of Bayer
Drugs Details
  • Drugs Type  : Multum
  • Date : 28th Dec 2014 11:09 pm
  • Brand Name : Bayer
  • Generic Name : aspirin (oral) (Pronunciation: AS pir in)
Descriptions

Active ingredient (in each tablet)
Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). Pain reliever/fever reducer

Inactive ingredients
carnauba wax*, corn starch, hypromellose, powdered cellulose, triacetin

* may contain this ingredient

What are the possible side effects of aspirin?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • black, bloody, or tarry stools;
  • coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • severe nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain;
  • fever lasting longer than 3 days;
  • swelling, or pain lasting longer than 10 days; or
  • hearing problems, ringing in your ears.

Less serious...

Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Bayer »

What are the precautions when taking aspirin (Bayer)?

Before taking aspirin, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other salicylates (such as choline salicylate); or to other pain relievers or fever reducers (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

This medication should not be used if you have certain medical conditions. Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have: bleeding/blood-clotting disorders (such as hemophilia, vitamin K deficiency, low platelet count).

If you have any of the following health problems, consult your doctor or pharmacist before using this medication: kidney disease, liver...

Read All Potential Precautions of Bayer »

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Indications

Uses

  • headache
  • menstrual pain
  • minor pain of arthritis
  • muscle pain
  • pain and fever of colds
  • toothache

Dosage Administration

Directions

  • drink a full glass of water with each dose
  • adults and children 12 years and over: take 1 or 2 tablets every 4 hours or 3 tablets every 6 hours, not to exceed 12 tablets in 24 hours
  • children under 12 years: consult a doctor

Other information

  • save carton for full directions and warnings
  • store at room temperature

Questions or comments?
1-800-331-4536 (Mon-Fri 9AM – 5PM EST)
or www.bayeraspirin.com

How Supplied

Packaging

Tablets and caplets are available in the following package types:

Travel pack - 12 tablets
Bottles of 24, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 tablets
Bottles of 50 and 100 caplets
There are child-resistant safety closures on packages of 12, 24, 50, 200, 300, and 400 tablets and 100 caplets. Bottles of 100 tablets and 50 caplets are available without safety closure for households without small children.

Copyright ©2006 Bayer (aspirin) HealthCare LLC. All Rights Reserved. FDA rev date: 10/25/1995

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Side Effects

No information provided.

Read the Bayer (aspirin) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Interactions

No information provided.

Read the Bayer Drug Interactions Center for a complete guide to possible interactions

Learn More »

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Warnings

Reye's syndrome: Children and teenagers should not use this medicine for chicken pox or flu symptoms before a doctor is consulted about Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious illness reported to be associated with aspirin.

Allergy alert: Aspirin may cause a severe allergic reaction which may include:

  • hives
  • facial swelling
  • asthma (wheezing)
  • shock

Precautions

No information provided.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

OverDose

No information provided.

ContrainDications

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Clinical Pharamacology

As the active ingredient in aspirin, acetylsalicylic acid works by inhibiting several different chemical processes within the body, including the natural physiological processes causing pain and inflammation.

Aspirin relieves pain by inhibiting production of chemicals called prostaglandins, aspirin works to diminish the body's response to a chain of chemical processes that eventually leads to pain. This mechanism of action works on a cellular level.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Patient Information

Alcohol warning: If you consume 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day, ask your doctor whether you should take aspirin or other pain relievers/fever reducers. Aspirin may cause stomach bleeding.

Do not use if you are allergic to aspirin or any other pain reliever/fever reducer

Ask a doctor before use if you have:

  • stomach problems (such as heartburn, upset stomach, or stomach pain) that last or come back
  • bleeding problems
  • ulcers
  • asthma

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before use if you are taking a prescription drug for:

  • anticoagulation (blood thinning)
  • gout
  • diabetes
  • arthritis

Stop use and ask a doctor if:

  • an allergic reaction occurs. Seek medical help right away.
  • pain gets worse or lasts more than 10 days
  • redness or swelling is present
  • fever lasts more than 3 days
  • new symptoms occur
  • ringing in the ears or loss of hearing occurs

If pregnant or breast-feeding, ask a health professional before use. It is especially important not to use aspirin during the last 3 months of pregnancy unless definitely directed to do so by a doctor because it may cause problems in the unborn child or complications during delivery.

Keep out of reach of children. In case of overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Consumer Overview Uses

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

 

ASPIRIN - ORAL

 

(AS-pir-in)

 

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Easprin, Ecotrin

 

USES: Aspirin is used to reduce fever and relieve mild to moderate pain from conditions such as muscle aches, toothaches, common cold, and headaches. It may also be used to reduce pain and swelling in conditions such as arthritis. Aspirin is known as a salicylate and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works by blocking a certain natural substance in your body to reduce pain and swelling. Consult your doctor before treating a child younger than 12 years.

Your doctor may direct you to take a low dose of aspirin to prevent blood clots. This effect reduces the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have recently had surgery on clogged arteries (such as bypass surgery, carotid endarterectomy, coronary stent), your doctor may direct you to use aspirin in low doses as a "blood thinner" to prevent blood clots.

 

HOW TO USE: If you are taking this medication for self-treatment, follow all directions on the product package. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist. If your doctor has directed you to take this medication, take it exactly as prescribed.

Take this medication by mouth. Drink a full glass of water (8 ounces/240 milliliters) with it unless your doctor tells you otherwise. Do not lie down for at least 10 minutes after you have taken this drug. If stomach upset occurs while you are taking this medication, you may take it with food or milk.

Swallow enteric-coated tablets whole. Do not crush or chew enteric-coated tablets. Doing so can increase stomach upset.

Do not crush or chew extended-release tablets or capsules. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split extended-release tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing.

The dosage and length of treatment are based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Read the product label to find recommendations on how many tablets you can take in a 24-hour period and how long you may self-treat before seeking medical advice. Do not take more medication or take it for longer than recommended unless directed by your doctor. Use the smallest effective dose. Consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

If you are taking this medication for self-treatment of headache, seek immediate medical attention if you also have slurred speech, weakness on one side of the body, or sudden vision changes. Before using this drug, consult a doctor or pharmacist if you have headaches caused by head injury, coughing, or bending, or if you have a headache with persistent/severe vomiting, fever, and stiff neck.

If you are taking this medication as needed (not on a regular schedule), remember that pain medications work best if they are used as the first signs of pain occur. If you wait until the pain has worsened, the medicine may not work as well. Aspirin with a special coating (enteric coating) or slow release may take longer to stop pain because it is absorbed more slowly. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to help select the best type of aspirin for you.

You should not take this medication for self-treatment of pain for longer than 10 days. You should not use this drug to self-treat a fever that lasts longer than 3 days. In these cases, consult a doctor because you may have a more serious condition. Tell your doctor promptly if you develop ringing in the ears or difficulty hearing.

If your condition persists or worsens (such as new or unusual symptoms, redness/swelling of the painful area, pain/fever that does not go away or gets worse) or if you think you may have a serious medical problem, tell your doctor promptly.

Consumer Overview Side Effect

SIDE EFFECTS: Upset stomach and heartburn may occur. If either of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, remember that he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: easy bruising/bleeding, difficulty hearing, ringing in the ears, change in the amount of urine, persistent or severe nausea/vomiting, unexplained tiredness, dizziness, dark urine, yellowing eyes/skin.

This drug may rarely cause serious bleeding from the stomach/intestine or other areas of the body. If you notice any of the following rare but very serious side effects, seek immediate medical attention: black/tarry stools, persistent or severe stomach/abdominal pain, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, slurred speech, weakness on one side of the body, sudden vision changes or severe headache.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

 

Read the Bayer (aspirin) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Learn More »

PRECAUTIONS: Before taking aspirin, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other salicylates (such as choline salicylate); or to other pain relievers or fever reducers (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

This medication should not be used if you have certain medical conditions. Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have: bleeding/blood-clotting disorders (such as hemophilia, vitamin K deficiency, low platelet count).

If you have any of the following health problems, consult your doctor or pharmacist before using this medication: kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes, stomach problems (such as ulcers, heartburn, stomach pain), aspirin-sensitive asthma (a history of worsening breathing with runny/stuffy nose after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs), growths in the nose (nasal polyps), gout, certain enzyme deficiencies (pyruvate kinase or G6PD deficiency).

This medicine may cause stomach bleeding. Daily use of alcohol and tobacco, especially when combined with this product, may increase your risk for this side effect. Limit alcoholic beverages, and stop smoking. Check with your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking this medication.

Children and teenagers less than 18 years old should not take aspirin if they have chickenpox, flu, or any undiagnosed illness or if they have recently received a vaccine. In these cases, taking aspirin increases the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious illness. Tell your doctor promptly if you see changes in behavior with nausea and vomiting. This may be an early sign of Reye's syndrome.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially stomach/intestinal bleeding and ulcers.

Aspirin is not recommended for use during pregnancy. Consult your doctor before using this medication if you are or think you may be pregnant. Tell your doctor immediately if you become pregnant while taking this medication. Do not use this medication during the last 3 months of pregnancy because of possible harm to the unborn baby or problems during delivery.

Aspirin passes into breast milk and may harm the nursing infant. Breast-feeding while using this drug is not recommended. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Consumer Overview Missed Dose

DRUG INTERACTIONS: If you are taking this product under your doctor's direction, your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Before you start taking this medication for self-treatment, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you are also using any prescription and nonprescription medications. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor or pharmacist first.

This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: mifepristone.

If you are currently using any of these medications, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting aspirin.

Before using this product, consult your doctor if you have recently received certain live vaccines (such as varicella vaccine, live flu vaccine).

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription products you may use, especially of: acetazolamide, "blood thinners" (such as warfarin, heparin), corticosteroids (such as prednisone), methotrexate, pemetrexed, valproic acid, herbal medications such as ginkgo biloba.

Check all prescription and nonprescription medicine labels carefully since many medications contain pain relievers/fever reducers known as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen, ketorolac, naproxen). To prevent an overdose of aspirin, read the labels carefully before taking other pain relievers or cold products to make sure they do not contain aspirin. Ask your pharmacist about using these products safely.

Daily use of NSAIDs (such as ibuprofen) may decrease aspirin's ability to prevent heart attack/stroke. If you are taking low-dose aspirin for prevention of heart attack/stroke, consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details and to discuss other possible treatments (such as acetaminophen) for your pain/fever.

This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including certain urine sugar tests), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you are taking this medication.

This document does not contain all possible interactions. Therefore, before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

 

OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: burning pain in the throat/stomach, confusion, mental/mood changes, fainting, weakness, ringing in the ears, fever, rapid breathing, change in the amount of urine, seizures, loss of consciousness.

 

NOTES: If you use this medication regularly or at high doses, laboratory and/or medical tests (such as liver and kidney function tests, blood count, salicylate level) may be performed to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

There are many different aspirin products. Some have special coatings and some are long-acting. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to recommend the best product for you.

 

MISSED DOSE: If your doctor directs you to take this drug on a regular schedule (not just "as needed") and you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

 

STORAGE: Store at room temperature between 59-86 degrees F (15-30 degrees C) away from moisture and light. Do not store above 104 degrees F (40 degrees C). Different brands of this medication may have different storage needs. Check the product package for instructions on how to store your brand, or ask your pharmacist. Do not store in the bathroom. Do not use any aspirin product that has a strong vinegar-like smell. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

 

Information last revised October 2013. Copyright(c) 2013 First Databank, Inc.

Patient Detailed Side Effect

Brand Names: Arthritis Pain, Aspergum Cherry, Aspergum Orginal, Aspir 81, Aspirin Lite Coat, Aspirin Litecoat, Aspirin Low Dose, Aspirin Low Strength, Aspir-Low, Bayer Aspirin, Bayer Aspirin Regimen, Bayer Aspirin Sugar Free, Bayer Aspirin with Calcium, Bayer Childrens Aspirin, Bayer Low Strength, Bayer Plus, Buffered Aspirin, Bufferin, Bufferin Arthritis Strength, Bufferin Extra Strength, Easprin, Ecotrin, Ecotrin Adult Low Strength, Ecotrin Maximum Strength, Fasprin, Genacote, Halfprin, Litecoat Aspirin, Norwich Aspirin, St. Joseph Aspirin, St. Joseph Aspirin Adult Chewable, St. Joseph Aspirin Adult EC, Stanback Analgesic, Tri-Buffered Aspirin, YSP Aspirin, Zorprin

Generic Name: aspirin (oral) (Pronunciation: AS pir in)

  • What is aspirin (Bayer)?
  • What are the possible side effects of aspirin?
  • What is the most important information I should know about aspirin?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking aspirin?
  • How should I take aspirin?
  • What happens if I miss a dose?
  • What happens if I overdose?
  • What should I avoid while taking aspirin?
  • What other drugs will affect aspirin?
  • Where can I get more information?

What is aspirin (Bayer)?

Aspirin is in a group of drugs called salicylates (sa-LIS-il-ates). It works by reducing substances in the body that cause pain, fever, and inflammation.

Aspirin is used to treat mild to moderate pain, and also to reduce fever or inflammation. Aspirin is sometimes used to treat or prevent heart attacks, strokes, and chest pain (angina). Aspirin should be used for cardiovascular conditions only under the supervision of a doctor.

Aspirin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Aspirin 81 mg EC-TC

round, yellow, imprinted with LOGO HEART

What are the possible side effects of aspirin?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • black, bloody, or tarry stools;
  • coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • severe nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain;
  • fever lasting longer than 3 days;
  • swelling, or pain lasting longer than 10 days; or
  • hearing problems, ringing in your ears.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • upset stomach, heartburn;
  • drowsiness; or
  • headache.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Bayer (aspirin) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Learn More »

What is the most important information I should know about aspirin?

There are many brands and forms of aspirin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Aspirin should not be given to a child or teenager who has a fever, especially if the child also has flu symptoms or chicken pox. Aspirin can cause a serious and sometimes fatal condition called Reye's syndrome in children.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any symptoms of bleeding in your stomach or intestines. Symptoms include black, bloody, or tarry stools, and coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

Avoid drinking alcohol while you are taking aspirin. Alcohol may increase your risk of stomach bleeding.

Aspirin is sometimes used to treat or prevent heart attacks, strokes, and chest pain (angina). Aspirin should be used for cardiovascular conditions only under the supervision of a doctor.

Side Effects Centers
  • Aspirin

Patient Detailed How Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking aspirin?

Aspirin should not be given to a child or teenager who has a fever, especially if the child also has flu symptoms or chicken pox. Aspirin can cause a serious and sometimes fatal condition called Reye's syndrome in children.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to aspirin, or if you have:

  • a recent history of stomach or intestinal bleeding;
  • a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia; or
  • an allergy to an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as Advil, Motrin, Aleve, Orudis, Indocin, Lodine, Voltaren, Toradol, Mobic, Relafen, Feldene, and others.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take aspirin:

  • asthma or seasonal allergies;
  • stomach ulcers;
  • liver disease;
  • kidney disease;
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;
  • heart disease, high blood pressure, or congestive heart failure;
  • gout; or
  • nasal polyps.

If you are taking aspirin to prevent heart attack or stroke, avoid also taking ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin). Ibuprofen may make aspirin less effective in protecting your heart and blood vessels. If you must use both medications, take the ibuprofen at least 8 hours before or 30 minutes after you take the aspirin (non-enteric coated form).

This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby's heart, and may also reduce birth weight or have other dangerous effects. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while you are taking aspirin.

Aspirin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take aspirin?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger or smaller amounts, or use it for longer than recommended.

Take this medication with a full glass of water.

Taking aspirin with food or milk can lessen stomach upset. Enteric-coated aspirin is specially formulated to be gentle on your stomach, but you may take it with food or milk if desired.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open an enteric-coated or extended-release pill. Swallow the pill whole. The enteric-coated pill has a special coating to protect your stomach. Breaking the pill could damage this coating. The extended-release tablet is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking this pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

The chewable tablet form of aspirin must be chewed before swallowing.

Keep the orally disintegrating tablet in its package until you are ready to take the medicine. Open the package and peel the back cover from the tablet. Using dry hands, place the tablet into your mouth. It will begin to dissolve right away, without water. Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking aspirin. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Do not take this medication if you smell a strong vinegar odor in the aspirin bottle. The medicine may no longer be effective.

Store aspirin at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Side Effects Centers
  • Aspirin

Patient Detailed Avoid Taking

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since aspirin is often used as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are using the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include ringing in your ears, headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, confusion, hallucinations, rapid breathing, fever, seizure (convulsions), or coma.

What should I avoid while taking aspirin?

Do not use any other over-the-counter medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Aspirin is contained in many medicines available over the counter. If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much aspirin. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains aspirin.

Avoid taking an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) while you are taking aspirin. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others.

Avoid drinking alcohol while you are taking aspirin. Alcohol may increase your risk of stomach bleeding.

Avoid taking ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) if you are taking aspirin to prevent stroke or heart attack. Ibuprofen can make aspirin less effective in protecting your heart and blood vessels. If you must use both medications, take the ibuprofen at least 8 hours before or 30 minutes after you take the aspirin (non-enteric coated form).

What other drugs will affect aspirin?

Tell your doctor if you are taking an antidepressant such as citalopram (Celexa), duloxetine (Cymbalta), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), or venlafaxine (Effexor). Taking any of these drugs with aspirin may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Before taking aspirin, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin); or
  • another salicylate such as choline salicylate and/or magnesium salicylate (Magan, Doan's, Bayer Select Backache Pain Formula, Mobidin, Arthropan, Trilisate, Tricosal), or salsalate (Disalcid).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with aspirin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about aspirin.


Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2013 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 12.02. Revision date: 12/15/2010.

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Side Effects Centers
  • Aspirin

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