Drugs Details

Drugs Info of Thyrolar-1, Thyrolar-1/2, Thyrolar-1/4, Thyrolar-2, Thyrolar-3
Drugs Details
  • Drugs Type  : FDA
  • Date : 17th Feb 2015 06:32 am
  • Brand Name : Thyrolar-1, Thyrolar-1/2, Thyrolar-1/4, Thyrolar-2, Thyrolar-3
  • Generic Name : liotrix (Pronunciation: LYE oh trix)
Descriptions

Thyrolar Tablets (Liotrix Tablets, USP) contain triiodothyronine (T3 liothyronine) sodium and tetraiodothyronine (T4levothyroxine) sodium in the amounts listed in the "How Supplied" section. (T3 liothyronine sodium is approximately four times as potent as T4thyroxine on a microgram for microgram basis.)

The inactive ingredients are calcium phosphate, colloidal silicon dioxide, corn starch, lactose, and magnesium stearate. The tablets also contain the following dyes: Thyrolar (liotrix) 1/4 - FD&C Blue #1 and FD&C Red #40; Thyrolar (liotrix) ½ - FD&C Red #40 and D&C Yellow #10; Thyrolar (liotrix) 1 - FD&C Red #40; Thyrolar (liotrix) 2 - FD&C Blue #1, FD&C Red #40, and D&C Yellow #10; Thyrolar (liotrix) 3 - FD&C Red #40 and D&C Yellow #10.

STRUCTURAL FORMULAS

Thyrolar (T3 liothyronine  and T4 levothyroxine) structural formula illustration

What are the possible side effects of liotrix (Thyrolar-1, Thyrolar-1/2, Thyrolar-1/4, Thyrolar-2, Thyrolar-3)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • headache;
  • nausea;
  • depression, anxiety, feeling weak or tired;
  • weight gain;
  • dry or itchy skin;
  • joint or muscle pain; or
  • temporary hair loss (especially in children).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical...

Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Thyrolar »

What are the precautions when taking liotrix (Thyrolar)?

Before taking liotrix, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

This medication should not be used if you have certain medical conditions. Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have: increased thyroid hormones (thyrotoxicosis), a heart attack (acute myocardial infarction), adrenal gland problem (e.g., uncorrected adrenal insufficiency).

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: heart disease (e.g., coronary artery disease, irregular heartbeat), high blood pressure, diabetes, other hormone...

Read All Potential Precautions of Thyrolar »

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Indications

Thyrolar (liotrix) Tablets are indicated:

  1. As replacement or supplemental therapy in patients with hypothyroidism of any etiology, except transient hypothyroidism during the recovery phase of subacute thyroiditis. This category includes cretinism, myxedema, and ordinary hypothyroidism in patients of any age (children, adults, the elderly), or state (including pregnancy); primary hypothyroidism resulting from functional deficiency, primary atrophy, partial or total absence of thyroid gland, or the effects of surgery, radiation, or drugs, with or without the presence of goiter; and secondary (pituitary), or tertiary (hypothalamic) hypothyroidism (See WARNINGS).
  2. As pituitary TSH suppressants, in the treatment or prevention of various types of euthyroid goiters, including thyroid nodules, subacute or chronic Iymphocytic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's), multinodular goiter, and in the management of thyroid cancer.
  3. As diagnostic agents in suppression tests to differentiate suspected mild hyperthyroidism or thyroid gland autonomy.

Dosage Administration

The dosage of Thyrolar Tablets (Liotrix Tablets, USP) is determined by the indication and must in every case be individualized according to patient response and laboratory findings.

Thyroid hormones are given orally. In acute, emergency conditions, injectable sodium levothyroxine may be given intravenously when oral administration is not feasible or desirable, as in the treatment of myxedema coma, or during total parenteral nutrition. Intramuscular administration is not advisable because of reported poor absorption.

Hypothyroidism

Therapy is usually instituted using low doses with increments which depend on the cardiovascular status of the patient. The usual starting dose is one tablet of Thyrolar (liotrix) ½ with increments of one tablet of Thyrolar (liotrix) !4 every 2 to 3 weeks. A lower starting dosage, one tablet of Thyrolar (liotrix) %/day, is recommended in patients with long-standing myxedema, particularly if cardiovascular impairment is suspected, in which case extreme caution is recommended. The appearance of angina is an indication for a reduction in dosage. Most patients require one tablet of Thyrolar (liotrix) 1 to one tablet of Thyrolar (liotrix) 2 per day. Failure to respond to doses of one tablet of Thyrolar (liotrix) 3 suggests lack of compliance or malabsorption. Maintenance dosages of one tablet of Thyrolar (liotrix) 1 to one tablet of Thyrolar (liotrix) 2 per day usually result in normal serum levothyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels. Adequate therapy usually results in normal TSH and T4 levels after 2 to 3 weeks of therapy.

Readjustment of thyroid hormone dosage should be made within the first four weeks of therapy, after proper clinical and laboratory evaluations, including serum levels of T4, bound and free, and TSH.

T3 may be used in preference to levothyroxine (T4) during radio-isotope scanning procedures, since induction of hypothyroidism in those cases is more abrupt and can be of shorter duration. It may also be preferred when impairment of peripheral conversion of T4 and T3 is suspected.

Myxedema Coma

Myxedema coma is usually precipitated in the hypothyroid patient of long-standing by intercurrent illness or drugs such as sedatives and anesthetics and should be considered a medical emergency. Therapy should be directed at the correction of electrolyte disturbances and possible infection besides the administration of thyroid hormones. Corticosteroids should be administered routinely. T4 and T3 may be administered via a nasogastric tube but the preferred route of administration of both hormones is intravenous. Sodium levothyroxine (T4) is given at a starting dose of 400 mcg (100 mcg/mL) given rapidly, and is usually well tolerated, even in the elderly. This initial dose is followed by daily supplements of 100 to 200 mcg given IV. Normal T4 levels are achieved in 24 hours followed in 3 days by threefold elevation of T3. Oral therapy with thyroid hormone would be resumed as soon as the clinical situation has been stabilized and the patient is able to take oral medication.

Thyroid Cancer

Exogenous thyroid hormone may produce regression of metastases from follicular and papillary carcinoma of the thyroid and is used as ancillary therapy of these conditions with radioactive iodine. TSH should be suppressed to low or undetectable levels. Therefore, larger amounts of thyroid hormone than those used for replacement therapy are required. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid is usually unresponsive to this therapy.

Thyroid Suppression Therapy

Administration of thyroid hormone in doses higher than those produced physiologically by the gland results in suppression of the production of endogenous hormone. This is the basis for the thyroid suppression test and is used as an aid in the diagnosis of patients with signs of mild hyperthyroidism in whom baseline laboratory tests appear normal, or to demonstrate thyroid gland autonomy in patients with Grave's ophthalmopathy. 131I uptake is determined before and after the administration of the exogenous hormone. A fifty percent or greater suppression of uptake indicates a normal thyroid-pituitary axis and thus rules out thyroid gland autonomy.

For adults, the usual suppressive dose of levothyroxine (T4) is 1.56 mcg/kg of body weight per day given for 7 to 10 days. These doses usually yield normal serum T4 and T3 levels and lack of response to TSH.

Thyroid hormones should be administered cautiously to patients in whom there is strong suspicion of thyroid gland autonomy, in view of the fact that the exogenous hormone effects will be additive to the endogenous source.

Pediatric Dosage

Pediatric dosage should follow the recommendations summarized in Table 1. In infants with congenital hypothyroidism, therapy with full doses should be instituted as soon as the diagnosis has been made.

Recommended Pediatric Dosage for Congenital Hypothyroidism

  Dose per day in mcg
Age T3/T4 to T3/T4
0-6 mos 3.1/12.5 to 6.25/25
6-12 MOs 6.25/25 to 9.35/37.5
1-5 yrs 9.35/37.5 to 12.5/50
6-12 yrs 12.5/50 to 18.75/75
Over 12 yrs over 18.75/75
 

How Supplied

Thyrolar Tablets (Liotrix Tablets, USP) are available in five potencies coded as follows:

Name Composition
(T3/T4 per tablet)
Color Armacode® NDC
Thyrolar-1/4 3.1 mcg/ 12.5 mcg Violet/White YC 0456-0040-01
Thyrolar-½ 6.25 mcg/ 25 mcg Peach/White YD 0456-0045-01
Thyrolar-1 12.5 mcg/ 50 mcg Pink/White YE 0456-0050-01
Thyrolar-2 25 mcg/ 100 mcg Green/White YF 0456-0055-01
Thyrolar-3 37.5 mcg/ 150 mcg Yellow/White YH 0456-0060-01

Supplied in bottles of 100, two-layered compressed tablets.

Tablets should be stored at cold temperature, between 36F and 46F (2C and 8C) in a tight, light-resistant container.

Note: (T3 liothyronine sodium is approximately four times as potent as T4 thyroxine on a microgram for microgram basis.)

Forest Pharmaceuticals, Inc. A Subsidiary of Forest Laboratories, Inc. St. Louis, MO 63045. Rev. 04/05

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Side Effects

During postmarketing surveillance, the following events have been observed to have occured in patients administered Thyrolar (liotrix) : fatigue, sluggishness, increase in weight, alopecia, palpitations, dry skin, urticaria, headache, hyperhidrosis, pruritus, asthenia, increased blood pressure, arthralgia, myalgia, tremor, hypothyroidism, increase in TSH, decrease in TSH, nausea, chest pain, hypersensitivity, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, increased heart rate, irregular heart rate, anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

Adverse reactions other than those indicative of hyperthyroidism because of therapeutic overdosage, either initially or during the maintenance period, are rare (See OVERDOSAGE).

Read the Thyrolar (liotrix) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

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Interactions

Oral Anticoagulants

Thyroid hormones appear to increase catabolism of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors. If oral anticoagulants are also being given, compensatory increases in clotting factor synthesis are impaired. Patients stabilized on oral anticoagulants who are found to require thyroid replacement therapy should be watched very closely when thyroid is started. If a patient is truly hypothyroid, it is likely that a reduction in anticoagulant dosage will be required. No special precautions appear to be necessary when oral anticoagulant therapy is begun in a patient already stabilized on maintenance thyroid replacement therapy.

Insulin or Oral Hypoglycemics

Initiating thyroid replacement therapy may cause increases in insulin or oral hypoglycemic requirements. The effects seen are poorly understood and depend upon a variety of factors such as dose and type of thyroid preparations and endocrine status of the patient. Patients receiving insulin or oral hypoglycemics should be closely watched during initiation of thyroid replacement therapy.

Cholestyramine or Colestipol

Cholestyramine or colestipol binds both T4 and T3 in the intestine thus impairing absorption of these thyroid hormones. In vitro studies indicate that the binding is not easily removed. Therefore, four to five hours should elapse between administration of cholestyramine or colestipol and thyroid hormones.

Estrogen, Oral Contraceptives

Estrogens tend to increase serum thyroxine-binding globulin (TBg). In a patient with a nonfunctioning thyroid gland who is receiving thyroid replacement therapy, free levothyroxine may be decreased when estrogens are started, thus increasing thyroid requirements. However, if the patient's thyroid gland has sufficient function, the decreased free thyroxine will result in a compensatory increase in thyroxine output by the thyroid. Therefore, patients without a functioning thyroid gland who are on thyroid replacement therapy may need to increase their thyroid dose if estrogens or estrogen-containing oral contraceptives are given.

Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions

The following drugs or moieties are known to interfere with laboratory tests performed in patients on thyroid hormone therapy: androgens, corticosteroids, estrogens, oral contraceptives containing estrogens, iodine-containing preparations, and the numerous preparations containing salicylates.

  1. Changes in TBg concentration should be taken into consideration in the interpretation of T4 and T3 values. In such cases, the unbound (free) hormone should be measured. Pregnancy, estrogens, and estrogen-containing oral contraceptives increase TBg concentrations. TBg may also be increased during infectious hepatitis. Decreases in TBg concentrations are observed in nephrosis, acromegaly, and after androgen or corticosteroid therapy. Familial hyper- or hypothyroxine-binding-globulinemias have been described. The incidence of TBg deficiency approximates 1 in 9,000. The binding of thyroxine by TBPA is inhibited by salicylates.
  2. Medicinal or dietary iodine interferes with all in vivo tests of radio-iodine uptake, producing low uptakes which may not be relative of a true decrease in hormone synthesis.
  3. The persistence of clinical and laboratory evidence of hypothyroidism in spite of adequate dosage replacement indicates either poor patient compliance, poor absorption, excessive fecal loss, or inactivity of the preparation. Intracellular resistance to thyroid hormone is quite rare.

Read the Thyrolar Drug Interactions Center for a complete guide to possible interactions

Learn More »

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Warnings

Drugs with thyroid hormone activity, alone or together with other therapeutic agents, have been used for the treatment of obesity. In euthyroid patients, doses within the range of daily hormonal requirements are ineffective for weight reduction. Larger doses may produce serious or even life-threatening manifestations of toxicity, particularly when given in association with sympathomimetic amines such as those used for their anorectic effects.

The use of thyroid hormones in the therapy of obesity, alone or combined with other drugs, is unjustified and has been shown to be ineffective. Neither is their use justified for the treatment of male or female infertility unless this condition is accompanied by hypothyroidism.

Precautions

General

Thyroid hormones should be used with great caution in a number of circumstances where the integrity of the cardiovascular system, particularly the coronary arteries, is suspected. These include patients with angina pectoris or the elderly, in whom there is a greater likelihood of occult cardiac disease. In these patients therapy should be initiated with low doses, i.e., one tablet of Thyrolar (liotrix) % or Thyrolar (liotrix) %. When, in such patients, a euthyroid state can only be reached at the expense of an aggravation of the cardiovascular disease, thyroid hormone dosage should be reduced.

Thyroid hormone therapy in patients with concomitant diabetes mellitus or diabetes insipidus or adrenal cortical insufficiency aggravates the intensity of their symptoms. Appropriate adjustments of the various therapeutic measures directed at these concomitant endocrine diseases are required. The therapy of myxedema coma requires simultaneous administration of glucocorticoids (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

Hypothyroidism decreases and hyperthyroidism increases the sensitivity to oral anticoagulants. Prothrombin time should be closely monitored in thyroid treated patients on oral anticoagulants and dosage of the latter agents adjusted on the basis of frequent prothrombin time determinations. In infants, excessive doses of thyroid hormone preparations may produce craniosynostosis.

Laboratory Tests

Treatment of patients with thyroid hormones requires the periodic assessment of thyroid status by means of appropriate laboratory tests besides the full clinical evaluation. The TSH suppression test can be used to test the effectiveness of any thyroid preparation bearing in mind the relative insensitivity of the infant pituitary to the negative feedback effect of thyroid hormones. Serum T4 levels can be used to test the effectiveness of all thyroid medications except T3. When the total serum T4 is low but TSH is normal, a test specific to assess unbound (free) T4 levels is warranted. Specific measurements of T4 and T3 by competitive protein binding or radioimmunoassay are not influenced by blood levels of organic or inorganic iodine.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, and Impairment of Fertility

A reportedly apparent association between prolonged thyroid therapy and breast cancer has not been confirmed and patients on thyroid for established indications should not discontinue therapy. No confirmatory long-term studies in animals have been performed to evaluate carcinogenic potential, mutagenicity, or impairment of fertility in either males or females.

Pregnancy-Category A

Thyroid hormones do not readily cross the placental barrier. The clinical experience to date does not indicate any adverse effect on fetuses when thyroid hormones are administered to pregnant women. On the basis of current knowledge, thyroid replacement therapy to hypothyroid women should not be discontinued during pregnancy.

Nursing Mothers

Minimal amounts of thyroid hormones are excreted in human milk. Thyroid is not associated with serious adverse reactions and does not have a known tumorigenic potential. However, caution should be exercised when thyroid is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use

Pregnant mothers provide little or no thyroid hormone to the fetus. The incidence of congenital hypothyroidism is relatively high (1:4000) and the hypothyroid fetus would not derive any benefit from the small amounts of hormone crossing the placental barrier. Routine determinations of serum (T4) and/or TSH is strongly advised in neonates in view of the deleterious effects of thyroid deficiency on growth and development.

Treatment should be initiated immediately upon diagnosis, and maintained for life, unless transient hypothyroidism is suspected; in which case, therapy may be interrupted for 2 to 8 weeks after the age of 3 years to reassess the condition. Cessation of therapy is justified in patients who have maintained a normal TSH during those 2 to 8 weeks.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

OverDose

Signs and Symptoms

Excessive doses of thyroid result in a hypermetabolic state resembling in every respect the condition of endogenous origin. The condition may be self-induced.

Treatment of Overdosage

Dosage should be reduced or therapy temporarily discontinued if signs and symptoms of overdosage appear.

Treatment may be reinstituted at a lower dosage. In normal individuals, normal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis function is restored in 6 to 8 weeks after thyroid suppression.

Treatment of acute massive thyroid hormone overdosage is aimed at reducing gastrointestinal absorption of the drugs and counteracting central and peripheral effects, mainly those of increased sympathetic activity. Vomiting may be induced initially if further gastrointestinal absorption can reasonably be prevented and barring contraindications such as coma, convulsions, or loss of the gagging reflex. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. Oxygen may be administered and ventilation maintained. Cardiac glycosides may be indicated if congestive heart failure develops. Measures to control fever, hypoglycemia, or fluid loss should be instituted if needed. Antiadrenergic agents, particularly propranolol, have been used advantageously in the treatment of increased sympathetic activity. Propranolol may be administered intravenously at a dosage of 1 to 3 mg over a 10 minute period or orally, 80 to 160 mg/day, initially, especially when no contraindications exist for its use.

ContrainDications

Thyroid hormone preparations are generally contraindicated in patients with diagnosed but as yet uncorrected adrenal cortical insufficiency, untreated thyrotoxicosis, and apparent hypersensitivity to any of their active or extraneous constituents. There is no well documented evidence from the literature, however, of true allergic or idiosyncratic reactions to thyroid hormone.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Clinical Pharamacology

The steps in the synthesis of the thyroid hormones are controlled by thyrotropin (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, TSH) secreted by the anterior pituitary. This hormone's secretion is in turn controlled by a feedback mechanism effected by the thyroid hormones themselves and by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), a tripeptide of hypothalamic origin. Endogenous thyroid hormone secretion is suppressed when exogenous thyroid hormones are administered to euthyroid individuals in excess of the normal gland's secretion.

The mechanisms by which thyroid hormones exert their physiologic action are not well understood. These hormones enhance oxygen consumption by most tissues of the body, increase the basal metabolic rate, and the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. Thus, they exert a profound influence on every organ system in the body and are of particular importance in the development of the central nervous system.

The normal thyroid gland contains approximately 200 mcg of levothyroxine (T4) per gram of gland, and 15 mcg of triiodothyronine (T3) per gram. The ratio of these two hormones in the circulation does not represent the ratio in the thyroid gland, since about 80 percent of peripheral triiodothyronine comes from mon-odeiodination of levothyroxine. Peripheral monodeiodination of levothyroxine at the 5 position (inner ring) also results in the formation of reverse triiodothyronine (T3), which is calorigenically inactive.

Triiodothyronine (T3) levels are low in the fetus and newborn, in old age, in chronic caloric deprivation, hepatic cirrhosis, renal failure, surgical stress, and chronic illnesses representing what has been called the "low triiodothyronine syndrome."

Pharmacokinetics

Animal studies have shown that T4 is only partially absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. The degree of absorption is dependent on the vehicle used for its administration and by the character of the intestinal contents, the intestinal flora, including plasma protein, soluble dietary factors, all of which bind thyroid and thereby make it unavailable for diffusion. Only 41 percent is absorbed when given in a gelatin capsule as opposed to a 74 percent absorption when given with an albumin carrier.

Depending on other factors, absorption has varied from 48 to 79 percent of the administered dose. Fasting increases absorption. Malabsorption syndromes, as well as dietary factors (children's soybean formula, concomitant use of anionic exchange resins such as cholestyramine) cause excessive fecal loss. T3 is almost totally absorbed, 95 percent in 4 hours. The hormones contained in the natural preparations are absorbed in a manner similar to the synthetic hormones.

More than 99 percent of circulating hormones are bound to serum proteins, including thyroid-binding globulin (TBg), thyroid-binding prealbumin (TBPA), and albumin (TBa), whose capacities and affinities vary for the hormones. The higher affinity of levothyroxine (T4) for both TBg and TBPA as compared to triiodothyronine (T3) partially explains the higher serum levels and longer half-life of the former hormone. Both protein-bound hormones exist in reverse equilibrium with minute amounts of free hormone, the latter accounting for the metabolic activity.

Deiodination of levothyroxine (T4) occurs at a number of sites, including liver, kidney, and other tissues. The conjugated hormone, in the form of glucuronide or sulfate, is found in the bile and gut where it may complete an enterohepatic circulation. Eighty-five percent of levothyroxine (T4) metabolized daily is deiodinated.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Patient Information

Patients on thyroid hormone preparations and parents of children on thyroid therapy should be informed that:

  1. Replacement therapy is to be taken essentially for life, with the exception of cases of transient hypothyroidism, usually associated with thyroiditis, and in those patients receiving a therapeutic trial of the drug.
  2. They should immediately report during the course of therapy any signs or symptoms of thyroid hormone toxicity, e.g., chest pain, increased pulse rate, palpitations, excessive sweating, heat intolerance, nervousness, or any other unusual event.
  3. In case of concomitant diabetes mellitus, the daily dosage of antidiabetic medication may need readjustment as thyroid hormone replacement is achieved. If thyroid medication is stopped, a downward readjustment of the dosage of insulin or oral hypoglycemic agent may be necessary to avoid hypoglycemia. At all times, close monitoring of urinary glucose levels is mandatory in such patients.
  4. In case of concomitant oral anticoagulant therapy, the prothrombin time should be measured frequently to determine if the dosage of oral anticoagulants is to be readjusted.
  5. Partial loss of hair may be experienced by children in the first few months of thyroid therapy, but this is usually a transient phenomenon and later recovery is usually the rule.
  6. Tablets should be stored at cold temperature, between 36°F and 46°F (2°C and 8°C) in a tight, light-resistant container.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Consumer Overview Uses

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

 

LIOTRIX - ORAL

 

(LYE-oh-tricks)

 

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Thyrolar

 

WARNING: This medication should not be used for weight loss. Normal doses of this medication will not work for weight loss, and large doses of this medication may cause serious, possibly fatal side effects, especially when taken with diet pills.

 

USES: See also Warning section.

Liotrix is used to treat an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). It replaces or provides more of a certain natural substance (thyroid hormone) that is normally produced by the thyroid gland. Low thyroid hormone levels can occur naturally or when the thyroid gland is injured by radiation/medications or removed by surgery. Having enough thyroid hormone in your bloodstream is important for maintaining normal mental and physical activity. In children, having enough thyroid hormone is important for normal mental and physical development.

This medication is also used to treat other types of thyroid disorders (e.g., certain types of goiters, thyroid cancer).

This medication should not be used to treat infertility unless it is caused by low thyroid hormone levels.

 

HOW TO USE: Take this medication by mouth, usually once a day on an empty stomach, 30 minutes to 1 hour before breakfast, or as directed by your doctor.

Dosage is based on your medical condition, laboratory test results, and response to treatment. For children, the dosage is also based on age. Your doctor will usually start you on a low dose and slowly increase your dose as needed.

Use this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day.

Do not stop taking this medication without first consulting with your doctor. Thyroid replacement treatment is usually taken for life.

Symptoms of low thyroid hormone levels include tiredness, muscle aches, constipation, dry skin, weight gain, slow heartbeat, or sensitivity to cold. Tell your doctor if your condition worsens or persists after several weeks of taking this medication.

Consumer Overview Side Effect

SIDE EFFECTS: Some hair loss may occur during the first few months of starting this drug. This effect is usually temporary as your body adjusts to this medication. If this effect persists or worsens, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious effects of high thyroid hormone levels occur: diarrhea, bone pain, headache, mental/mood changes (e.g., nervousness, mood swings), shaking (tremor), sensitivity to heat, increased sweating, tiredness.

Seek immediate medical attention if any of these rare but very serious effects of high thyroid hormone levels occur: chest pain, fast/pounding/irregular heartbeat, seizures, swelling of the ankles/feet.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

 

Read the Thyrolar (liotrix) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Learn More »

PRECAUTIONS: Before taking liotrix, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

This medication should not be used if you have certain medical conditions. Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have: increased thyroid hormones (thyrotoxicosis), a heart attack (acute myocardial infarction), adrenal gland problem (e.g., uncorrected adrenal insufficiency).

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: heart disease (e.g., coronary artery disease, irregular heartbeat), high blood pressure, diabetes, other hormone disorders (e.g., decreased pituitary hormone).

If you have diabetes, this medication may increase your blood sugar levels. Check your blood glucose levels regularly as directed by your doctor. Tell your doctor immediately if you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as increased thirst and urination. Your anti-diabetic medication or diet may need to be adjusted.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking this medication.

Caution is advised when using this drug in the elderly because they may be more sensitive to the effects on the heart caused by high thyroid hormone level.

Current information shows that this drug may be used during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or if you become pregnant because your dose may need to be adjusted.

Small amounts of this medication pass into breast mi

Consumer Overview Missed Dose

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor or pharmacist first.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: androgens/anabolic steroids, beta blockers (e.g., propranolol), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., dexamethasone), cytokines (e.g., interferon-alpha, interleukin-2), digoxin, drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove liotrix from your body (such as phenobarbital, rifamycins including rifabutin, certain anti-seizure medicines including carbamazepine/phenytoin), drugs that can decrease thyroid hormone levels (e.g., amiodarone, medications containing iodide/iodine, lithium), estrogen-containing products (including birth control pills), growth hormones, medications for depression (e.g., maprotiline, tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline, SSRIs such as sertraline), theophylline.

Certain medications (cholestyramine, colestipol, antacids, sucralfate, simethicone, iron, sodium polystyrene sulfonate, calcium carbonate, orlistat) can decrease the amount of liotrix that is absorbed by your body . If you are taking any of these drugs, separate them from this medication by at least 4 hours.

Check the labels on all your medicines (e.g., cough-and-cold products, diet aids) because they may contain ingredients such as decongestants or caffeine that could increase your heart rate or blood pressure. Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely.

This document does not contain all possible interactions. Therefore, before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

 

OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: fast/pounding/irregular heartbeat, loss of consciousness, confusion, slurred speech, seizures.

 

NOTES: Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (e.g., thyroid stimulating hormone-TSH levels) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

 

MISSED DOSE: If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up unless your doctor instructs you to do so. Call your doctor if you miss 2 or more doses in a row. Ask your doctor ahead of time what to do about a missed dose and follow your doctor's specific directions.

 

STORAGE: Store in the refrigerator between 36-46 degrees F (2-8 degrees C) away from light. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

 

Information last revised March 2013. Copyright(c) 2013 First Databank, Inc.

Patient Detailed Side Effect

Brand Names: Thyrolar-1, Thyrolar-1/2, Thyrolar-1/4, Thyrolar-2, Thyrolar-3

Generic Name: liotrix (Pronunciation: LYE oh trix)

  • What is liotrix (Thyrolar)?
  • What are the possible side effects of liotrix (Thyrolar)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about liotrix (Thyrolar)?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking liotrix (Thyrolar)?
  • How should I take liotrix (Thyrolar)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (Thyrolar)?
  • What happens if I overdose (Thyrolar)?
  • What should I avoid while taking liotrix (Thyrolar)?
  • What other drugs will affect liotrix (Thyrolar)?
  • Where can I get more information?

What is liotrix (Thyrolar)?

Liotrix is a man-made form of a hormone that is normally produced by your thyroid gland to regulate the body's energy and metabolism. Liotrix is given when the thyroid does not produce enough of this hormone on its own.

Liotrix treats hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone). Liotrix is also used to treat or prevent goiter (enlarged thyroid gland), and is also given as part of a medical tests for thyroid disorders.

Liotrix should not be used to treat obesity or weight problems.

Liotrix may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of liotrix (Thyrolar)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • headache;
  • nausea;
  • depression, anxiety, feeling weak or tired;
  • weight gain;
  • dry or itchy skin;
  • joint or muscle pain; or
  • temporary hair loss (especially in children).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Thyrolar (liotrix) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Learn More »

What is the most important information I should know about liotrix (Thyrolar)?

Since thyroid hormone occurs naturally in the body, almost anyone can take liotrix. However, you may not be able to use this medication if you have a thyroid disorder called thyrotoxicosis, or an adrenal gland problem that is not controlled by treatment.

Before taking liotrix, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, angina (chest pain), coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes, or problems with your pituitary or adrenal glands.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood may need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. You may need to take thyroid medication for the rest of your life.

Call your doctor if you notice any signs of thyroid toxicity, such as chest pain, fast or pounding heartbeats, feeling hot or nervous, or sweating more than usual.

Side Effects Centers
  • Thyrolar

Patient Detailed How Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking liotrix (Thyrolar)?

Since thyroid hormone occurs naturally in the body, almost anyone can take liotrix. However, you may not be able to use this medication if you have a thyroid disorder called thyrotoxicosis, or an adrenal gland problem that is not controlled by treatment.

To make sure you can safely take liotrix, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • heart disease, angina (chest pain);
  • coronary artery disease;
  • congestive heart failure;
  • any type of diabetes; or
  • problems with your pituitary or adrenal gland.

FDA pregnancy category A. Liotrix is not expected to harm an unborn baby. However, tell your doctor if you become pregnant, since your dose needs may be different during pregnancy.

Small amounts of liotrix can pass into breast milk, but this is not expected to harm a nursing baby. However, do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take liotrix (Thyrolar)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood may need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. You may need to take thyroid medication for the rest of your life.

Call your doctor if you notice any signs of thyroid toxicity, such as chest pain, fast or pounding heartbeats, feeling hot or nervous, or sweating more than usual.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using liotrix. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store liotrix tablets in a tightly closed container in the refrigerator. Protect the medicine from light and do not allow it to freeze.

Side Effects Centers
  • Thyrolar

Patient Detailed Avoid Taking

What happens if I miss a dose (Thyrolar)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose (Thyrolar)?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include headache, sweating, diarrhea, irregular menstrual periods, confusion, weakness, swelling in your hands or feet, fast heart rate, chest pain, feeling short of breath, fainting, or feeling nervous, restless, or irritable.

What should I avoid while taking liotrix (Thyrolar)?

Do not change brands or change to a generic drug product without first asking your doctor. Different brands of liotrix may not work the same. If you get a prescription refill and your new pills look different, talk with your pharmacist or doctor.

If you also take cholestyramine (Prevalite, Questran) or colestipol (Colestid), avoid taking these medications within 4 hours before or after you take liotrix.

What other drugs will affect liotrix (Thyrolar)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

  • birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy;
  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);
  • digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);
  • epinephrine (EpiPen) or norepinephrine (Levophed);
  • insulin or oral diabetes medication;
  • medications that contain iodine (such as I-131);
  • an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip), doxepin (Sinequan), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others;
  • salicylates such as aspirin, Backache Relief Extra Strength, Novasal, Nuprin Backache Caplet, Doan's Pills Extra Strength, Pepto-Bismol, Tricosal, and others;
  • steroids such as prednisone and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with liotrix. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about liotrix.


Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2013 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 2.02. Revision date: 12/15/2010.

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