Drugs Details

Drugs Info of Serax
Drugs Details
  • Drugs Type  : Multum
  • Date : 28th Feb 2015 08:13 am
  • Brand Name : Serax
  • Generic Name : oxazepam (Pronunciation: ox A ze pam
Descriptions

Serax (oxazepam) is the first of a chemical series of compounds known as the 3-hydroxybenzodiazepinones. A therapeutic agent providing versatility and flexibility in control of common emotional disturbances, this product exerts prompt action in a wide variety of disorders associated with anxiety, tension, agitation, and irritability, and anxiety associated with depression. In tolerance and toxicity studies on several animal species, this product reveals significantly greater safety factors than related compounds (chlordiazepoxide and diazepam) and manifests a wide separation of effective doses and doses inducing side effects.

Serax capsules contain 10 mg, 15 mg, or 30 mg oxazepam. The inactive ingredients present are FD&C Red 40, gelatin, lactose, titanium dioxide, and other ingredients. Each dosage strength also contains the following:

10 mg—D&C Red 22, D&C Red 28, and FD&C Blue 1;
15 mg—FD&C Yellow 6;
30 mg—D&C Red 28 and FD&C Blue 1.

Serax tablets contain 15 mg oxazepam. The inactive ingredients present are FD&C Yellow 5, lactose, magnesium stearate, methylcellulose and polacrilin potassium. Serax (oxazepam) is 7-chloro-1,3-dihydro-3-hydroxy-5-phenyl-2H-1,4-benzodi-azepin-2-one. A white crystalline powder with a molecular weight of 286.7, its structural formula is as follows:

Serax (oxazepam) structural formula illustration

What are the possible side effects of oxazepam (Serax)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • confusion;
  • unusual risk-taking behavior, decreased inhibitions, no fear of danger;
  • hyperactivity, agitation, hostility;
  • hallucinations;
  • feeling lightheaded, fainting;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or
  • problems with urination.

Less serious side effects may...

Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Serax »

What are the precautions when taking oxazepam (Serax)?

Before taking oxazepam, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: liver disease, kidney disease, lung/breathing problems (e.g., COPD, sleep apnea), drug or alcohol abuse.

This drug may make you dizzy or drowsy or cause blurred vision. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Avoid alcoholic beverages.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug,...

Read All Potential Precautions of Serax »


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Indications

Serax (oxazepam) is indicated for the management of anxiety disorders or for the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety or tension associated with the stress of everyday life usually does not require treatment with an anxiolytic.

Anxiety associated with depression is also responsive to Serax (oxazepam) therapy. This product has been found particularly useful in the management of anxiety, tension, agitation, and irritability in older patients.

Alcoholics with acute tremulousness, inebriation, or with anxiety associated with alcohol withdrawal are responsive to therapy.

The effectiveness of Serax (oxazepam) in long-term use, that is, more than 4 months, has not been assessed by systematic clinical studies. The physician should periodically reassess the usefulness of the drug for the individual patient.

Dosage Administration

Because of the flexibility of this product and the range of emotional disturbances responsive to it, dosage should be individualized for maximum beneficial effects.

Usual Dose

Mild-to-moderate anxiety, with associated tension, irritability, agitation, or related symptoms of functional origin or secondary to organic disease. 10 to 15 mg, 3 or 4 times daily
Severe anxiety syndromes, agitation, or anxiety associated with depression. 15 to 30 mg, 3 or 4 times daily
Older patients with anxiety, tension, irritability, and agitation. Initial dosage: 10 mg, 3 times daily, if necessary, increase cautiously to 15 mg, 3 or 4 times daily.
Alcoholics with acute inebriation, tremulousness, or anxiety on withdrawal. 15 to 30 mg, 3 or 4 times daily*

This product is not indicated in pediatric patients under 6 years of age. Absolute dosage for pediatric patients 6 to 12 years of age is not established.

How Supplied

Serax (oxazepam) Capsules and Tablets are available In the following dosage strengths:

10 mg, NDC 63857-327-10, white and pink capsule marked "SERAX (oxazepam) ", "10*. and "327", in bottles of 100 capsules.

15 mg, NDC 63857-328-10, white and red capsule marked "SERAX (oxazepam) ", "15", and "328", in bottles of 100 capsules.

30 mg, NDC 63857-329-10, white and maroon capsule marked "SERAX (oxazepam) ", "30". and "329", in bottles of 100 capsules.

15 mg, NDC 63857-332-10, yellow, five-sided, flat-faced, beveled edge tablet with a raised "S* on one side and "SERAX (oxazepam) " and "15" on the other side, in bottles of 100 tablets.

Store at room temperature, approximately 25° C (77* F). Keep tightly closed. Dispense in tight container. Reference

1. FOX, KA; LAHCEN, R.8.: Liver-cell Adenomas and Poliosis Hepatis In Mice Associated with Oxazepam. Res. Commun. Chem. Pathol. Pharmacol. 8:481-488,1974.

Manufactured for Fauldino Laboratories Inc. Raleigh, NC 27608. By. Wyeth Laboratories Inc., A Wyeth-Ayerst Company Philadelphia PA 19101. Revision June 2000.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Side Effects

The necessity for discontinuation of therapy due to undesirable effects has been rare. Transient, mild drowsiness is commonly seen In the first few days of therapy. If it persists, the dosage should be reduced. In few instances, dizziness, vertigo, headache, and rarely syncope have occurred either alone or together with drowsiness. Mild paradoxical reactions. i.e.., excitement, stimulation of affect, have been reported in psychiatric patients; these reactions may be secondary to relief of anxiety and usually appear in the first two weeks of therapy.

Other side effects occurring during oxazepam therapy include rare instances of nausea, lethargy, edema, slurred speech, tremor, altered libido, and minor diffuse skin rashes—morbilliform, urticarial, and maculopapular. Such side effects have been Infrequent and are generally controlled with reduction of dosage. A case of an extensive fixed drug eruption also has been reported.

Although rare, leukopenia and hepatic dysfunction including Jaundice have been reported during therapy. Periodic blood counts and liver-function tests are advisable.

Ataxia with oxazepam has been reported in rare instances and does not appear to be specifically related to dose or age.

Although the following side reactions have not as yet been reported with oxazepam, they have occurred with related compounds (chlordiazepoxide and diazepam): paradoxical excitation with severe rage reactions, hallucinations, menstrual irregularities, change In EEG pattern, blood dyscrasias including agranulocytosis, blurred vision, diplopia, incontinence, stupor, disorientation, fever, and euphoria.

Transient amnesia or memory impairment has been reported in association with the use of benzodiazepines.

Read the Serax (oxazepam) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Interactions

No information provided.

Read the Serax Drug Interactions Center for a complete guide to possible interactions

Learn More »


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Warnings

As with other CNS-acting drugs, patients should be cautioned against driving automobiles or operating dangerous machinery until it is known that they do not become drowsy or dizzy on oxazepam therapy.

Patients should be warned that the effects of alcohol or other CNS-depressant drugs may be additive to those of Serax (oxazepam) , possibly requiring adjustment of dosage or elimination of such agents.

Physical and Psychological Dependence

Withdrawal symptoms, similar in character to those noted with barbiturates and alcohol (convulsions, tremor, abdominal and muscle cramps, vomiting, and sweating), have occurred following abrupt discontinuance of oxazepam. The more severe withdrawal symptoms have usually been limited to those patients who received excessive doses over an extended period of time. Generally milder withdrawal symptoms (e.g., dysphoria and insomnia) have been reported following abrupt discontinuance of benzodiazepines taken continuously at therapeutic levels for several months. Consequently, after extended therapy, abrupt discontinuation should generally be avoided and a gradual dosage-tapering schedule followed. Addiction-prone individuals (such as drug addicts or alcoholics) should be under careful surveillance when receiving oxazepam or other psychotropic agents because of the predisposition of such patients to habituation and dependence.

Use in Pregnancy

An increased risk of congenital malformations associated with the use of minor tranquilizers (chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, and meprobamate) during the first trimester of pregnancy has been suggested in several studies. Serax (oxazepam) , a benzodiazepine derivative, has not been studied adequately to determine whether It, too, may be associated with an increased risk of fetal abnormality. Because use of these drugs is rarely a matter of urgency, their use during this period should almost always be avoided. The possibility that a woman of childbearing potential may be pregnant at the time of Institution Of therapy should be considered. Patients should be advised that if they become pregnant during therapy or intend to become pregnant they should communicate with their physician about the desirability of discontinuing the drug.

Precautions

General

Although hypotension has occurred only rarely, oxazepam should be administered with caution to patients in whom a drop in blood pressure might lead to cardiac complications. This is particularly true in the elderly patient.

Serax (oxazepam) 15 mg tablets, but none of the other available dosage forms of this product, contain FD&C Yellow 5 (tartrazine) which may cause allergic-type reactions (including bronchial asthma) in certain susceptible individuals. Although the overall incidence of FD&C Yellow 5 (tartrazine) sensitivity in the general population is low, it is frequently seen in patients who also have aspirin hypersensitivity.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients under 6 years of age have not been established. Absolute dosage for pediatric patients 6 to 12 years of age is not established.

Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of Serax (oxazepam) were not adequate to determine whether subjects aged 65 and over respond differently than younger subjects. Age (< 80 years old) does not appear to have a clinically significant effect on oxazepam kinetics (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY).

Clinical circumstances, some of which may be more common in the elderly, such as hepatic or renal impairment, should be considered. Greater sensitivity of some older individuals to the effects of Serax (oxazepam) (e.g., sedation, hypotension, paradoxical excitation) cannot be ruled out (see PRECAUTIONS, General; see ADVERSE REACTIONS). In general, dose selection for Serax (oxazepam) for elderly patients should be cautious, usually starting at the lower end of the dosing range (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

OverDose

In the management of overdosage with any drug, it should be borne in mind that multiple agents may have been taken.

Symptoms

Overdosage of benzodiazepines is usually manifested by varying degrees of central nervous system depression ranging from drowsiness to coma. In mild cases, symptoms include drowsiness, mental confusion and lethargy. In more serious cases, and especially when other drugs or alcohol were Ingested, symptoms may include ataxia, hypotonia, hypotension, hypnotic state, stage one (1) to three (3) coma, and very rarely, death.

Management

Induced vomiting and/or gastric lavage should be undertaken, followed by general supportive care, monitoring of vital signs, and close observation of the patient. Hypotension, though unlikely, usually may be controlled with norepinephrine bitartrate Injection. The value of dialysis has not been adequately determined for oxazepam.

The benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil may be used In hospitalized patients as an adjunct to, not as a substitute for, proper management of benzodiazepine overdose. The prescriber should be aware of a risk of seizure in association with flumazenil treatment, particularly In long-term benzodiazepine users and in cyclic antidepressant overdose. The complete flumazenil package insert including "CONTRAINDICATIONS," "WARNINGS," and "PRECAUTIONS' should be consulted prior to use.

ContrainDications

History of previous hypersensitivity reaction to oxazepam. Oxazepam is not Indicated in psychoses.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Clinical Pharamacology

Pharmacokinetic testing In twelve volunteers demonstrated that when given as a single 30 mg dose, the capsule, tablet, and suspension were equivalent in extent of absorption. For the capsule and tablet, peak plasma levels averaged 450 ng/mL and were observed to occur about 3 hours after dosing. The mean elimination half-life for oxazepam was approximately 8.2 hours (range 5.7 to 10.9 hours). This product has a single, major inactive metabolite in man, a glucuronide excreted in the urine.

Age (< 80 years old) does not appear to have a clinically significant effect on oxazepam kinetics. A statistically significant increase in elimination half-life in the very elderly (> 80 years of age) as compared to younger subjects has been reported, due to a 30% increase in volume of distribution, as well as a 50% reduction in unbound clearance of oxazepam in the very elderly, (see PRECAUTIONS, Geriatric Use).

Animal Pharmacology And Toxicology

In mice, Serax (oxazepam) exerts an anticonvulsant (anti-Metrazol) activity at 50-per-cent-effective doses of about 0.6 mg/kg orally. (Such anticonvulsant activity of benzodiazepines correlates with their tranquilizing properties.) To produce ataxia (rotabar test) and sedation (abolition of spontaneous motor activity), the 50-percent-effective doses of this product are greater than 5 mg/kg orally. Thus, about ten times the therapeutic (anticonvulsant) dose must be given before ataxia ensues, indicating a wide separation of effective doses and doses inducing side effects.

In evaluation of anti anxiety activity of compounds, conflict behavioral tests in rats differentiate continuous response for food in the presence of anxiety-provoking stress (shock) from drug-induced motor in coordination. This product shows significant separation of doses required to relieve anxiety and doses producing sedation or ataxia. Ataxia-producing doses exceed those of related CNS-acting drugs.

Acute oral LDM in mice is greater than 5000 mg/kg, compared to 800 mg/kg for a related compound (chlordiazepoxide). Subacute toxicity studies in dogs for four weeks at 480 mg/kg daily showed no specific changes; at 960 mg/kg two out of eight died with evidence of circulatory collapse. This wide margin of safety is significant compared to chlordiazepoxide HCL, which showed nonspecific changes in six dogs at 80 mg/kg. On chlordiazepoxide, two out of six died with evidence of circulatory collapse at 127 mg/kg, and six out of six died at 200 mg/kg daily. Chronic toxicity studies of Serax (oxazepam) in dogs at 120 mg/kg/day for 52 weeks produced no toxic manifestation. Fatty metamorphosis of the liver has been noted in six-week toxicity studies in rats given this product at 0.5% of the diet. Such accumulations of fat are considered reversible, as there is no liver necrosis or fibrosis. Breeding studies in rats through two successive litters did not produce fetal abnormality.

Oxazepam has not been adequately evaluated for mutagenic activity. In a carcinogenicity study, oxazepam was administered with diet to rats for two years. Male rats receiving 30 times the maximum human dose showed a statistical increase, when compared to controls, in benign thyroid follicular cell tumors, testicular interstitial cell adenomas, and prostatic adenomas. An earlier published study reported that mice fed dietary dosages of 35 or 100 times the human daily dose of oxazepam for 9 months developed a dose-related increase in liver adenomas.' In an independent analysis of some of the microscopic slides from this mouse study, several of these tumors were classified as liver carcinomas. At this time, there is no evidence that clinical use of oxazepam is associated with tumors.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Patient Information

To assure the safe and effective use of Serax (oxazepam), patients should be informed that, since benzodiazepines may produce psychological and physical dependence, it is advisable that they consult with their physician before either increasing the dose or abruptly discontinuing this drug.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Consumer Overview Uses

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

 

OXAZEPAM - ORAL

 

(ox-AZ-eh-pam)

 

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Serax

 

USES: Oxazepam is used to treat anxiety and also acute alcohol withdrawal. This medication belongs to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines which act on the brain and nerves (central nervous system) to produce a calming and an anti-seizure effect. It works by enhancing the effects of a certain natural substance in the body (GABA).

This medication may also be used for sleep (insomnia)

 

HOW TO USE: Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, age, and response to therapy.

Use this medication exactly as prescribed. Do not increase your dose, take it more frequently or use it for a longer period of time than prescribed because this drug can be habit-forming. Also, if used for an extended period of time, do not suddenly stop using this drug without your doctor's approval. Some conditions may become worse when the drug is abruptly stopped. Your dose may need to be gradually decreased to avoid side effects such as seizures.

When used for an extended period, this medication may not work as well and may require different dosing. Talk with your doctor if this medication stops working well.

Inform your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

Consumer Overview Side Effect

SIDE EFFECTS: Drowsiness, dizziness, blurred vision, or headache may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: mental/mood changes, slurred speech, clumsiness, trouble walking, decreased/increased interest in sex, tremor, trouble urinating, sleep disturbances.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these highly unlikely but very serious side effects occur: fainting, stomach/abdominal pain, persistent nausea, vomiting, fatigue, yellowing eyes or skin, dark urine, persistent sore throat or fever.

A serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction include: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

 

Read the Serax (oxazepam) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Learn More »

PRECAUTIONS: Before taking oxazepam, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: liver disease, kidney disease, lung/breathing problems (e.g., COPD, sleep apnea), drug or alcohol abuse.

This drug may make you dizzy or drowsy or cause blurred vision. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Avoid alcoholic beverages.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially drowsiness. This side effect can increase the risk of falling.

This medication is not recommended for use during pregnancy due to the potential for harm to an unborn baby. If you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant, inform your doctor immediately. Consult your doctor for more details.

This drug passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Consumer Overview Missed Dose

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first.

This drug should not be used with the following medications because very serious interactions may occur: sodium oxybate.

If you are currently using any of these medications, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting oxazepam.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: clozapine, digoxin, kava, levodopa.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you also take drugs that cause drowsiness such as: antihistamines that cause drowsiness (e.g., diphenhydramine), anti-seizure drugs (e.g., carbamazepine), medicine for sleep (e.g., sedatives), muscle relaxants, narcotic pain relievers (e.g., codeine), psychiatric medicines (e.g., phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine, or tricyclics such as amitriptyline), tranquilizers.

Check the labels on all your medicines (e.g., cough-and-cold products) because they may contain drowsiness-causing ingredients. Ask your pharmacist about the safe use of those products.

Smoking can decrease the effectiveness of this drug (through liver enzyme induction). Tell your doctor if you smoke or if you have recently stopped smoking because your dose may need to be adjusted.

This document does not contain all possible interactions. Therefore, before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

 

OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: severe drowsiness, slowed/reduced reflexes, slowed breathing, fainting, loss of consciousness.

 

NOTES: Do not share this medication with others. It is against the law.

If this drug is used for an extended period of time, laboratory and/or medical tests (e.g., liver function tests, complete blood count) may be performed periodically to check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

 

MISSED DOSE: If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

 

STORAGE: Store at room temperature between 59 and 86 degrees F (15-30 degrees C) away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

 

Information last revised December 2013. Copyright(c) 2013 First Databank, Inc.

Patient Detailed Side Effect

Brand Names: Serax

Generic Name: oxazepam (Pronunciation: ox A ze pam)

  • What is oxazepam (Serax)?
  • What are the possible side effects of oxazepam (Serax)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about oxazepam (Serax)?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking oxazepam (Serax)?
  • How should I take oxazepam (Serax)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (Serax)?
  • What happens if I overdose (Serax)?
  • What should I avoid while taking oxazepam (Serax)?
  • What other drugs will affect oxazepam (Serax)?
  • Where can I get more information?

What is oxazepam (Serax)?

Oxazepam is in a group of drugs called benzodiazepines (ben-zoe-dye-AZE-eh-peens). Oxazepam affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety.

Oxazepam is used to treat anxiety disorders or alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Oxazepam may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Oxazepam 10 mg-ESI

pink, imprinted with 59911 5876

What are the possible side effects of oxazepam (Serax)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • confusion;
  • unusual risk-taking behavior, decreased inhibitions, no fear of danger;
  • hyperactivity, agitation, hostility;
  • hallucinations;
  • feeling lightheaded, fainting;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or
  • problems with urination.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • drowsiness, dizziness;
  • amnesia or forgetfulness, trouble concentrating;
  • slurred speech;
  • swelling;
  • headache;
  • skin rash;
  • nausea, vomiting, constipation;
  • irregular menstrual periods; or
  • loss of interest in sex.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Serax (oxazepam) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Learn More »

What is the most important information I should know about oxazepam (Serax)?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to oxazepam or to other benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clorazepate (Tranxene), diazepam (Valium), or lorazepam (Ativan).

This medication can cause birth defects in an unborn baby. Do not use oxazepam if you are pregnant.

Before taking oxazepam, tell your doctor if you have any breathing problems, glaucoma, porphyria, kidney or liver disease, or a history of depression, suicidal thoughts, or addiction to drugs or alcohol.

Do not drink alcohol while taking oxazepam. This medication can increase the effects of alcohol.

Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy. They can add to sleepiness caused by oxazepam.

Oxazepam may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Oxazepam should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

Side Effects Centers
  • Serax

Patient Detailed How Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking oxazepam (Serax)?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to oxazepam or to other benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clorazepate (Tranxene), diazepam (Valium), or lorazepam (Ativan).

Before taking oxazepam, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • glaucoma;
  • asthma, emphysema, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), or other breathing problems;
  • kidney or liver disease;
  • a history of depression or suicidal thoughts or behavior; or
  • a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take this medication.

Oxazepam can cause birth defects in an unborn baby. Do not use oxazepam without your doctor's consent if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Use an effective form of birth control while you are using this medication.

Oxazepam may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

The sedative effects of oxazepam may last longer in older adults. Accidental falls are common in elderly patients who take benzodiazepines. Use caution to avoid falling or accidental injury while you are taking oxazepam.

How should I take oxazepam (Serax)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

Oxazepam should be used for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 months without your doctor's advice.

Oxazepam may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Oxazepam should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

Contact your doctor if this medicine seems to stop working as well in treating your symptoms.

Do not stop using oxazepam suddenly without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Your symptoms may return when you stop using oxazepam after using it over a long period of time. You may also have seizures or withdrawal symptoms when you stop using oxazepam. Withdrawal symptoms may include tremor, sweating, trouble sleeping, muscle cramps, stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, confusion, unusual thoughts or behavior, and seizure (convulsions).

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your doctor will need to check your progress on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Store oxazepam at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Keep track of how many pills have been used from each new bottle of this medicine. Benzodiazepines are drugs of abuse and you should be aware if any person in the household is using this medicine improperly or without a prescription.

Side Effects Centers
  • Serax

Patient Detailed Avoid Taking

What happens if I miss a dose (Serax)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose (Serax)?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of oxazepam can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, confusion, weakness or tired feeling, muscle weakness, loss of balance or coordination, feeling light-headed, fainting, or coma.

What should I avoid while taking oxazepam (Serax)?

Do not drink alcohol while taking oxazepam. This medication can increase the effects of alcohol.

Oxazepam can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures or depression). They can add to sleepiness caused by oxazepam.

What other drugs will affect oxazepam (Serax)?

Before taking oxazepam, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton);
  • an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);
  • medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), mesoridazine (Serentil), pimozide (Orap), or thioridazine (Mellaril);
  • narcotic medications such as butorphanol (Stadol), codeine, hydrocodone (Lortab, Vicodin), levorphanol (Levo-Dromoran), meperidine (Demerol), methadone (Dolophine, Methadose), morphine (Kadian, MS Contin, Oramorph), naloxone (Narcan), oxycodone (OxyContin), propoxyphene (Darvon, Darvocet); or
  • antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Asendin), citalopram (Celexa), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), paroxetine (Paxil), protriptyline (Vivactil), sertraline (Zoloft), or trimipramine (Surmontil).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with oxazepam. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about oxazepam.


Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2013 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 6.03. Revision date: 12/15/2010.

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