Drugs Details

Drugs Info of Inderide
Drugs Details
  • Drugs Type  : Multum
  • Date : 30th Mar 2015 08:14 am
  • Brand Name : Inderide
  • Generic Name :  hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Pronunciation: HYE droe klor oh THYE a zide and proe PRAN oh lol
Descriptions

Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) Tablets for oral administration combine two antihypertensive agents: Inderal (propranolol hydrochloride), a beta-adrenergic blocking agent, and hydrochlorothiazide, a thiazide diuretic-antihypertensive. Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) 40/25 Tablets contain 40 mg propranolol hydrochloride and 25 mg hydrochlorothiazide; Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) 80/25 Tablets contain 80 mg propranolol hydrochloride and 25 mg hydrochlorothiazide.

Inderal (propranolol hydrochloride) is a synthetic beta-adrenergic receptor-blocking agent chemically described as 2-Propanol, l-[(l-methylethyl)amino]-3-(l-naphthalenyloxy)-, hydrochloride,(±)-. Its structural formula is:

 

Propranolol hydrochloride Structural Formula Illustration

Propranolol hydrochloride is a stable, white, crystalline solid which is readily soluble in water and ethanol. Its molecular weight is 295.80.

Hydrochlorothiazide is a white, or practically white, practically odorless, crystalline powder. It is slightly soluble in water; freely soluble in sodium hydroxide solution; sparingly soluble in methanol; insoluble in ether, chloroform, benzene, and dilute mineral acids. Its chemical name is: 6-Chloro-3,4-dihydro-2H-l,2,4-benzothiadiazine-7-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide. Its structural formula is:

 

Hydrochlorothiazide Structural Formula Illustration

The inactive ingredients contained in Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) Tablets are lactose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, stearic acid, and yellow ferric oxide.

What are the possible side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • eye pain, vision problems;
  • swelling, rapid weight gain, feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;
  • fast, slow, or uneven heartbeat;
  • easy bruising or bleeding;
  • numbness or tingly feeling in your hands or feet;
  • feeling weak, drowsy,...

Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Inderide »

What are the precautions when taking propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide (Inderide)?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to propranolol or hydrochlorothiazide; or to other thiazides (e.g., chlorothiazide); or if you have had a serious reaction to other beta blockers (e.g., metoprolol, atenolol); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: breathing problems (e.g., asthma, bronchitis, emphysema), diabetes, heart failure, certain types of heart rhythm problems (sinus bradycardia, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, second- or third-degree atrioventricular block), overactive thyroid...

Read All Potential Precautions of Inderide »


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Indications

Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) is indicated in the management of hypertension.

This fixed combination is not indicated for initial therapy of hypertension. Hypertension requires therapy titrated to the individual patient. If the fixed combination represents the dosage so determined, its use may be more convenient in patient management.

Dosage Administration

The dosage must be determined by individual titration.

Hydrochlorothiazide can be given at doses of 12.5 to 50 mg per day when used alone. The initial dose of propranolol is 80 mg daily, and it may be increased gradually until optimal blood pressure control is achieved. The usual effective dose when used alone is 160 to 480 mg per day.

One Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) Tablet twice daily can be used to administer up to 160 mg of propranolol and 50 mg of hydrochlorothiazide. For doses of propranolol greater than 160 mg the combination products are not appropriate, because their use would lead to an excessive dose of the thiazide component.

When necessary, another antihypertensive agent may be added gradually beginning with 50 percent of the usual recommended starting dose to avoid an excessive fall in blood pressure.

How Supplied

Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) 40/25

Each hexagonal-shaped, off-white, scored tablet, embossed with an "I" and imprinted with "INDERIDE (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) 40/25," contains 40 mg propranolol hydrochloride (InderalR) and 25 mg hydrochlorothiazide, in bottles of 100 (NDC 24090-484-88).

Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) 80/25 Each hexagonal-shaped, off-white, scored tablet, embossed with an "I" and imprinted with "INDERIDE (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) 80/25," contains 80 mg propranolol hydrochloride (InderalR) and 25 mg hydrochlorothiazide, in bottles of 100 (NDC 24090-488-88).

Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F); excursions permitted to 15°-30°C (59°-86°C). [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]

Protect from moisture, freezing, and excessive heat.

Dispense in a well-closed container as defined in the USP.

The appearance of these tablets is a registered trademark of Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

This product's label may have been updated. For current package insert and further product information, call our medical communications department toll-free at 888-38-1733. Manufactured for: Akrimax Pharmaceuticals, LLC Cranford, NJ 07016. By: Wyeth Pharmaceuticals Inc. Philadelphia, PA 19101. Revv date 01/2011


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Side Effects

The following adverse reactions have been observed, but there is not enough systematic collection of data to support an estimate of their frequency. Within each category, adverse reactions are listed in decreasing order of severity. Although many side effects are mild and transient, some require discontinuation of therapy.

Propranolol hydrochloride (Inderal®)

Cardiovascular: Congestive heart failure; hypotension; intensification of AV block; bradycardia; thrombocytopenic purpura; arterial insufficiency, usually of the Raynaud type; paresthesia of hands.

Central Nervous System: Reversible mental depression progressing to catatonia; mental depression manifested by insomnia, lassitude, weakness, fatigue; an acute reversible syndrome characterized by disorientation for time and place, short-term memory loss, emotional lability, slightly clouded sensorium, decreased performance on neuropsychometrics; hallucinations; visual disturbances; vivid dreams; light-headedness. Total daily doses above 160 mg (when administered as divided doses of greater than 80 mg each) may be associated with an increased incidence of fatigue, lethargy, and vivid dreams.

Gastrointestinal: Mesenteric arterial thrombosis; ischemic colitis; nausea, vomiting, epigastric distress, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, constipation.

Allergic: Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions; laryngospasm and respiratory distress; pharyngitis and agranulocytosis; fever combined with aching and sore throat; erythematous rash.

Respiratory: Bronchospasm.

Hematologic: Agranulocytosis; nonthrombocytopenic purpura; thrombocytopenic purpura.

Autoimmune: In extremely rare instances, systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported.

Miscellaneous: Male impotence. Alopecia, LE-like reactions, psoriasiform rashes, dry eyes, and Peyronie's disease have been reported rarely. Oculomucocutaneous reactions involving the skin, serous membranes, and conjunctivae reported for a beta blocker (practolol) have not been associated with propranolol.

Skin: Stevens-Johnson Syndrome; toxic epidermal necrolysis; exfoliative dermatitis; erythema multiforme; urticaria.

Hydrochlorothiazide

Cardiovascular: Orthostatic hypotension (may be aggravated by alcohol, barbiturates or narcotics).

Central Nervous System: Dizziness, vertigo, headache, xanthopsia, paresthesias.

Gastrointestinal: Pancreatitis; jaundice (intrahepatic cholestatic jaundice); sialadenitis; anorexia, nausea, vomiting, gastric irritation, cramping, diarrhea, constipation.

Hypersensitivity: Anaphylactic reactions; necrotizing angiitis (vasculitis, cutaneous vasculitis); respiratory distress including pneumonitis; fever; urticaria, rash, purpura, photosensitivity.

Hematologic: Aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia.

Skin: Erythema multiforme including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, exfoliative dermatitis including toxic epidermal necrolysis.

Miscellaneous: Hyperglycemia, glycosuria; hyperuricemia; muscle spasm; weakness; restlessness; transient blurred vision.

Whenever adverse reactions are moderate or severe, thiazide dosage should be reduced or therapy withdrawn.

Read the Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Interactions

Propranolol hvdrochloride (Inderal®)

Patients receiving catecholamine-depleting drugs such as reserpine should be closely observed if Inderide is administered. The added catecholamine-blocking action may produce an excessive reduction of resting sympathetic nervous activity, which may result in hypotension, marked bradycardia, vertigo, syncopal attacks, or orthostatic hypotension.

Caution should be exercised when patients receiving a beta blocker are administered a calcium-channel blocking drug, especially intravenous verapamil, for both agents may depress myocardial contractility or atrioventricular conduction. On rare occasions, the concomitant intravenous use of a beta blocker and verapamil has resulted in serious adverse reactions, especially in patients with severe cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, or recent myocardial infarction.

Both digitalis glycosides and beta-blockers slow atrioventricular conduction and decrease heart rate. Concomitant use can increase the risk of bradycardia.

Blunting of the antihypertensive effect of beta-adrenoceptor blocking agents by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported.

Hypotension and cardiac arrest have been reported with the concomitant use of propranolol and haloperidol.

Aluminum hydroxide gel greatly reduces intestinal absorption of propranolol.

Alcohol, when used concomitantly with propranolol, may increase plasma levels of propranolol.

Phenytoin, phenobarbitone, and rifampin accelerate propranolol clearance.

Chlorpromazine, when used concomitantly with propranolol, results in increased plasma levels of both drugs.

Antipyrine and lidocaine have reduced clearance when used concomitantly with propranolol.

Thyroxine may result in a lower than expected TS concentration when used concomitantly with propranolol.

Cimetidine decreases the hepatic metabolism of propranolol, delaying elimination and increasing blood levels.

Theophylline clearance is reduced when used concomitantly with propranolol.

Hydrochlorothiazide

Thiazide drugs may increase the responsiveness to tubocurarine.

Thiazides may decrease arterial responsiveness to norepinephrine. This diminution is not sufficient to preclude effectiveness of the pressor agent for therapeutic use.

Insulin requirements in diabetic patients may be increased, decreased, or unchanged. Hypokalemia may develop during concomitant use of corticosteroids or ACTH.

Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions

Hydrochlorothiazide

Thiazides may decrease serum FBI levels without signs of thyroid disturbance.

Thiazides should be discontinued before carrying out tests for parathyroid function (see "PRECAUTIONS—General").

Read the Inderide Drug Interactions Center for a complete guide to possible interactions

Learn More »


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Warnings

Propranolol hydrochloride (Inderal®)

Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions, have been associated with the administration of propranolol and hydrochlorothiazide (see "ADVERSE REACTIONS").

Cardiac Failure: Sympathetic stimulation is a vital component supporting circulatory function in congestive heart failure, and inhibition with beta blockade always carries the potential hazard of further depressing myocardial contractility and precipitating cardiac failure. Propranolol acts selectively without abolishing the inotropic action of digitalis on the heart muscle (i.e., that of supporting the strength of myocardial contractions). In patients already receiving digitalis, the positive inotropic action of digitalis may be reduced by propranolol's negative inotropic effect.

Patients Without a History of Heart Failure: Continued depression of the myocardium over a period of time can, in some cases, lead to cardiac failure. In rare instances, this has been observed during propranolol therapy. Therefore, at the first sign or symptom of impending cardiac failure, patients should be fully digitalized and/or given additional diuretic, and the response observed closely: a) if cardiac failure continues, despite adequate digitalization and diuretic therapy, propranolol therapy should be withdrawn (gradually, if possible); b) if tachyarrhythmia is being controlled, patients should be maintained on combined therapy and the patient closely followed until threat of cardiac failure is over.

Angina Pectoris: There have been reports of exacerbation of angina and, in some cases, myocardial infarction following abrupt discontinuation of propranolol therapy. Therefore, when discontinuance of propranolol is planned, the dosage should be gradually reduced and the patient should be carefully monitored. In addition, when propranolol is prescribed for angina pectoris, the patient should be cautioned against interruption or cessation of therapy without the physician's advice. If propranolol therapy is interrupted and exacerbation of angina occurs, it usually is advisable to reinstitute propranolol therapy and take other measures appropriate for the management of unstable angina pectoris. Since coronary artery disease may be unrecognized, it may be prudent to follow the above advice in patients considered at risk of having occult atherosclerotic heart disease, who are given propranolol for other indications.

Nonallergic Bronchospasm (e.g., chronic bronchitis, emphysema): PATIENTS WITH BRONCHOSPASTIC DISEASES SHOULD, IN GENERAL, NOT RECEIVE BETA BLOCKERS. Propranolol should be administered with caution since it may block bronchodilation produced by endogenous and exogenous catecholamine stimulation of beta receptors.

Major Surgery: Chronically administered beta-blocking therapy should not be routinely withdrawn prior to major surgery, however the impaired ability of the heart to respond to reflex adrenergic stimuli may augment the risks of general anesthesia and surgical procedures.

Diabetes and Hypoglycemia: Beta-adrenergic blockade may prevent the appearance of certain premonitory signs and symptoms (pulse rate and pressure changes) of acute hypoglycemia in labile insulin-dependent diabetes. In these patients, it may be more difficult to adjust the dosage of insulin. Hypoglycemic attack may be accompanied by a precipitous elevation of blood pressure in patients on propranolol.

Propranolol therapy, particularly in infants and children, diabetic or not, has been associated with hypoglycemia especially during fasting as in preparation for surgery. Hypoglycemia also has been found after this type of drug therapy and prolonged physical exertion and has occurred in renal insufficiency, both during dialysis and sporadically, in patients on propranolol.

Acute increases in blood pressure have occurred after insulin-induced hypoglycemia in patients on propranolol.

Thyrotoxicosis: Beta blockade may mask certain clinical signs of hyperthyroidism. Therefore, abrupt withdrawal of propranolol may be followed by an exacerbation of symptoms of hyperthyroidism, including thyroid storm. Propranolol may change thyroid-function tests, increasing T4 and reverse T3, and decreasing T3.

Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: Several cases have been reported in which, after propranolol, the tachycardia was replaced by a severe bradycardia requiring a demand pacemaker. In one case this resulted after an initial dose of 5 mg propranolol.

Skin Reactions: Cutaneous reactions, including Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, exfoliative dermatitis, erythema multiforme, and urticaria, have been reported with use of propranolol (see "ADVERSE REACTIONS").

Hydrochlorothiazide

Thiazides should be used with caution in severe renal disease. In patients with renal disease, thiazides may precipitate azotemia. In patients with impaired renal function, cumulative effects of the drug may develop.

Thiazides should also be used with caution in patients with impaired hepatic function or progressive liver disease, since minor alterations of fluid and electrolyte balance may precipitate hepatic coma.

Thiazides may add to or potentiate the action of other antihypertensive drugs. Potentiation occurs with ganglionic or peripheral adrenergic-blocking drugs.

Sensitivity reactions may occur in patients with a history of allergy or bronchial asthma. The possibility of exacerbation or activation of systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported.

Acute Myopia and Secondary Angle-closure Glaucoma

Hydrochlorothiazide, a sulfonamide, can cause an idiosyncratic reaction, resulting in acute transient myopia and acute angle-closure glaucoma. Symptoms include acute onset of decreased visual acuity or ocular pain and typically occur within hours to weeks of drug initiation. Untreated acute angle-closure glaucoma can lead to permanent vision loss. The primary treatment is to discontinue hydrochlorothiazide as rapidly as possible. Prompt medical or surgical treatments may need to be considered if the intraocular pressure remains uncontrolled. Risk factors for developing acute angle-closure glaucoma may include a history of sulfonamide or penicillin allergy.

Precautions

General

Propranolol hvdrochloride (Inderal®)

Propranolol should be used with caution in patients with impaired hepatic or renal function. Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) is not indicated for the treatment of hypertensive emergencies.

Risk of anaphylactic reaction. While taking beta blockers, patients with a history of severe anaphylactic reaction to a variety of allergens may be more reactive to repeated challenge, either accidental, diagnostic, or therapeutic. Such patients may be unresponsive to the usual doses of epinephrine used to treat allergic reaction.

Hydrochlorothiazide

All patients receiving thiazide therapy should be observed for clinical signs of fluid or electrolyte imbalance, namely hyponatremia, hypochloremic alkalosis, and hypokalemia. Serum and urine electrolyte determinations are particularly important when the patient is vomiting excessively or receiving parenteral fluids. Medication such as digitalis may also influence serum electrolytes. Warning signs, irrespective of cause, are: dryness of mouth, thirst, weakness, lethargy, drowsiness, restlessness, muscle pains or cramps, muscular fatigue, hypotension, oliguria, tachycardia, and gastrointestinal disturbances such as nausea and vomiting.

Hypokalemia may develop, especially with brisk diuresis or when severe cirrhosis is present.

Interference with adequate oral electrolyte intake will also contribute to hypokalemia. Hypokalemia can sensitize or exaggerate the response of the heart to the toxic effects of digitalis (e.g., increased ventricular irritability).

Hypokalemia may be avoided or treated by use of potassium supplements or foods with a high potassium content.

Any chloride deficit is generally mild, and usually does not require specific treatment except under extraordinary circumstances (as in liver or renal disease). Dilutional hyponatremia may occur in edematous patients in hot weather; appropriate therapy is water restriction rather than administration of salt, except in rare instances when the hyponatremia is life-threatening. In actual salt depletion, appropriate replacement is the therapy of choice.

Hyperuricemia may occur or frank gout may be precipitated in certain patients receiving thiazide therapy.

Diabetes mellitus which has been latent may become manifest during thiazide administration. The antihypertensive effects of the drug may be enhanced in the postsympathectomy patient.

If progressive renal impairment becomes evident, consider withholding or discontinuing diuretic therapy.

Calcium excretion is decreased by thiazides. Pathologic changes in the parathyroid gland with hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia have been observed in a few patients on prolonged thiazide therapy. The common complications of hyperparathyroidism, such as renal lithiasis, bone resorption, and peptic ulceration, have not been seen.

Laboratory Tests

Propranolol hvdrochloride (Inderal®)

Elevated blood urea levels in patients with severe heart disease, elevated serum transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase.

Hydrochlorothiazide

Periodic determination of serum electrolytes to detect possible electrolyte imbalance should be performed at appropriate intervals.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Combinations of propranolol and hydrochlorothiazide have not been evaluated for carcinogenic or mutagenic potential or for potential to adversely affect fertility.

Propranolol hydrochloride (Inderal®)

In dietary administration studies in which mice and rats were treated with propranolol for up to 18 months at doses of up to 150 mg/kg/day, there was no evidence of drug-related tumorigenesis.

In a study in which both male and female rats were exposed to propranolol in their diets at concentrations of up to 0.05%, from 60 days prior to mating and throughout pregnancy and lactation for two generations, there were no effects on fertility. Based on differing results from Ames Tests performed by different laboratories, there is equivocal evidence for a genotoxic effect of propranolol in bacteria (S.typhimurium strain TA 1538).

Hydrochlorothiazide

Two-year feeding studies in mice and rats conducted under the auspices of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) uncovered no evidence of a carcinogenic potential of hydrochlorothiazide in female mice (at doses of up to approximately 600 mg/kg/day) or in male and female rats (at doses of up to approximately 100 mg/kg/day). The NTP, however, found equivocal evidence for hepatocarcinogenicity in male mice.

Hydrochlorothiazide was not genotoxic in vitro in the Ames bacterial mutagen assay (S.typhimurium strains TA 98, TA 100, TA 1535, TA 1537 and TA 1538) or in the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) test for chromosomal aberrations. Nor was it genotoxic in vivo in assays using mouse germinal cell chromosomes, Chinese hamster bone marrow chromosomes, and the Drosophila sex-linked recessive lethal trait gene. Positive test results were obtained in the in vitro CHO Sister Chromatid Exchange (clastogenicity), Mouse Lymphoma Cell (mutagenicity) and Aspergillus nidulans non-disjunction assays.

Hydrochlorothiazide had no adverse effects on the fertility of mice and rats of either sex in studies wherein these species were exposed, via their diet, to doses of up to 100 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg, respectively, prior to mating and throughout gestation.

Pregnancy: Pregnancy Category C

Combinations of propranolol and hydrochlorothiazide have not been evaluated for effects on pregnancy in animals. Nor are there adequate and well-controlled studies of propranolol, hydrochlorothiazide, or Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) in pregnant women. Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Propranolol hydrochloride (Inderal®)

In a series of reproduction and developmental toxicology studies, propranolol was given to ratsby gavage or in the diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. At doses of 150 mg/kg/day ( > 30 times the dose of propranolol contained in the maximum recommended human daily dose of Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) ), but not at doses of 80 mg/kg/day, treatment was associated with embryotoxicity (reduced litter size and increased resorption sites) as well as neonatal toxicity (deaths). Propranolol also was administered (in the feed) to rabbits (throughout pregnancy and lactation) at doses as high as 150 mg/kg/day ( > 45 times the dose of propranolol contained in the maximum recommended daily human dose of Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) ). No evidence of embryo or neonatal toxicity was noted.

Intrauterine growth retardation, small placentas, and congenital abnormalities have been reported in human neonates whose mothers received propranolol during pregnancy. Neonates whose mothers received propranolol at parturition have exhibited bradycardia, hypoglycemia and/or respiratory depression. Adequate facilities for monitoring these infants at birth should be available.

Hydrochlorothiazide

Studies in which hydrochlorothiazide was orally administered to pregnant mice and rats at doses of up to 3000 and 1000 mg/kg/day, respectively, provided no evidence of harm to the fetus.

Thiazides cross the placental barrier and appear in cord blood. The use of thiazides in pregnant women requires that the anticipated benefit be weighed against possible hazards to the fetus. These hazards include fetal or neonatal jaundice, thrombocytopenia, and possibly other adverse reactions that have occurred in the adult.

Nursing Mothers

Propranolol hydrochloride (Inderal®)

Propranolol is excreted in human milk. Caution should be exercised when Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) is administered to a nursing woman.

Hydrochlorothiazide

Thiazides appear in breast milk. If the use of drug is deemed essential, the patient should stop nursing.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients.

In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

OverDose

The propranolol hydrochloride component may cause bradycardia, cardiac failure, hypotension, or bronchospasm. Propranolol is not significantly dialyzable.

The hydrochlorothiazide component can be expected to cause diuresis. Lethargy of varying degree may appear and may progress to coma within a few hours, with minimal depression of respiration and cardiovascular function, and in the absence of significant serum electrolyte changes or dehydration. The mechanism of central nervous system depression with thiazide overdosage is unknown. Gastrointestinal irritation and hypermotility can occur, temporary elevation of BUN has been reported, and serum electrolyte changes could occur, especially in patients with impairment of renal function.

The oral LD50 dosages in rats and mice for propranolol, hydrochlorothiazide, and combined propranolol/hydrochlorothiazide (40/25, 80/25) are 364 to 533 mg/kg, greater than 2,750 to 5,000 mg/kg, and 538 to 845 mg/kg, respectively.

Treatment

The following measures should be employed:

General—If ingestion is, or may have been, recent, evacuate gastric contents, taking care to prevent pulmonary aspiration.

Bradycardia—Administer atropine (0.25 to 1.0 mg). If there is no response to vagal blockade, administer isoproterenol cautiously.

Cardiac Failure—Digitalization and diuretics.

Hypotension—Vasopressors, e.g., levarterenol or epinephrine.

Bronchospasm—Administer isoproterenol and aminophylline.

Stupor or Coma—Administer supportive therapy as clinically warranted.

Gastrointestinal Effects—Though usually of short duration, these may require symptomatic treatment.

Abnormalities in BUN and/or Serum Electrolytes—Monitor serum electrolyte levels and renal function; institute supportive measures as required individually to maintain hydration, electrolyte balance, respiration, and cardiovascular-renal function.

ContrainDications

Propranolol hydrochloride (Inderal®)

Propranolol is contraindicated in 1) cardiogenic shock; 2) sinus bradycardia and greater than first-degree block; 3) bronchial asthma; 4) congestive heart failure (see "WARNINGS") unless the failure is secondary to a tachyarrhythmia treatable with propranolol.

Hydrochlorothiazide

Hydrochlorothiazide is contraindicated in patients with anuria or hypersensitivity to this or other sulfonamide-derived drugs.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Clinical Pharamacology

Propranolol hydrochloride (Inderal®)

Propranolol hydrochloride is a nonselective beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agent possessing no other autonomic nervous system activity. It specifically competes with beta-adrenergic receptor stimulating agents for available receptor sites. When access to beta-receptor sites is blocked by propranolol, the chronotropic, inotropic, and vasodilator responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation are decreased proportionately.

Propranolol is almost completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, but a portion is immediately metabolized by the liver on its first pass through the portal circulation.

Peak effect occurs in one to one-and-one-half hours. The biologic half-life is approximately four hours. Propranolol is not significantly dialyzable. There is no simple correlation between dose or plasma level and therapeutic effect, and the dose-sensitivity range, as observed in clinical practice, is wide. The principal reason for this is that sympathetic tone varies widely between individuals. Since there is no reliable test to estimate sympathetic tone or to determine whether total beta blockade has been achieved, proper dosage requires titration.

The mechanism of the antihypertensive effect of propranolol has not been established. Among the factors that may be involved in contributing to the antihypertensive action are (1) decreased cardiac output, (2) inhibition of renin release by the kidneys, and (3) diminution of tonic sympathetic nerve outflow from vasomotor centers in the brain. Although total peripheral resistance may increase initially, it readjusts to, or below, the pretreatment level with chronic use. Effects on plasma volume appear to be minor and somewhat variable. Propranolol has been shown to cause a small increase in serum potassium concentration when used in the treatment of hypertensive patients. Propranolol hydrochloride decreases heart rate, cardiac output, and blood pressure.

Beta-receptor blockade can be useful in conditions in which, because of pathologic or functional changes, sympathetic activity is detrimental to the patient. But there are also situations in which sympathetic stimulation is vital. For example, in patients with severely damaged hearts, adequate ventricular function is maintained by virtue of sympathetic drive, which should be preserved. In the presence of AV block greater than first degree, beta blockade may prevent the necessary facilitating effect of sympathetic activity on conduction. Beta blockade results in bronchial constriction by interfering with adrenergic bronchodilator activity, which should be preserved in patients subject to bronchospasm.

The proper objective of beta-blockade therapy is to decrease adverse sympathetic stimulation, but not to the degree that may impair necessary sympathetic support.

Hydrochlorothiazide

Hydrochlorothiazide is a benzothiadiazine (thiazide) diuretic closely related to chlorothiazide. The mechanism of the antihypertensive effect of the thiazides is unknown. Thiazides do not affect normal blood pressure.

Thiazides affect the renal tubular mechanism of electrolyte reabsorption. At maximal therapeutic dosage, all thiazides are approximately equal in their diuretic potency.

Thiazides increase excretion of sodium and chloride in approximately equivalent amounts. Natriuresis causes a secondary loss of potassium and bicarbonate. Onset of diuretic action of hydrochlorothiazide occurs in two hours, and the peak effect in about four hours. Its action persists for approximately six to 12 hours. Thiazides are eliminated rapidly by the kidney.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

 

Patient Information

Beta-adrenoreceptor blockade can cause reduction of intraocular pressure. Patients should be told that Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) may interfere with the glaucoma screening test. Withdrawal may lead to a return of increased intraocular pressure.


This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Consumer Overview Uses

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

 

PROPRANOLOL/HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE - ORAL

 

(pro-PRAN-oh-lol/HYE-droe-KLOR-oh-THYE-a-zide)

 

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Inderide

 

WARNING: Do not stop using this drug without first consulting your doctor. Your condition may become worse when the drug is suddenly stopped, especially if you have chest pain (angina) or heart disease (e.g., coronary artery disease, ischemic heart disease, high blood pressure). If your doctor decides you should no longer use this drug, you must gradually decrease your dose according to your doctor's instructions.

When gradually stopping this medication, it is recommended that you temporarily limit physical activity to decrease strain on the heart. Seek immediate medical attention if you develop: worsening chest pain, tightness/pressure in the chest, chest pain spreading to the jaw/neck/arm, unusual sweating, trouble breathing, or fast/irregular heartbeat.

 

USES: This product is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). Lowering high blood pressure helps prevent strokes, heart attacks, and kidney problems.

This product contains 2 medications. Propranolol is a beta blocker that works by blocking certain natural chemicals in your body (such as epinephrine) that affect the heart and blood vessels. This effect reduces heart rate, blood pressure, and strain on the heart. Hydrochlorothiazide is called a "water pill" (diuretic) and causes your body to get rid of extra salt and water. This effect may increase the amount of urine you make when you first start the medication. It also helps to relax the blood vessels so that blood can flow through the body more easily.

These medications are used together when 1 drug is not controlling your blood pressure. Your doctor should direct you to start taking the individual medications first, and then switch you over to this combination product if this is the best dose combination for you.

 

HOW TO USE: See also Warning section.

Take this medication by mouth, usually twice daily or as directed by your doctor. You may take this medication with or without food, but it is important to choose one way and take this medication the same way with every dose.

The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

If you take this drug too close to bedtime, you may need to wake up to urinate. Therefore, it is best to take this medication at least 4 hours before your bedtime. Consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions about your dosing schedule.

If you also take certain drugs to lower your cholesterol (bile acid-binding resins such as cholestyramine or colestipol), take this product at least 4 hours before or at least 4 to 6 hours after these medications.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same times each day. It is important to continue taking this medication even if you feel well. Most people with high blood pressure do not feel sick. It may take up to several weeks before you get the full benefit of this drug.

Tell your doctor if your condition worsens (e.g., your routine blood pressure readings increase).

Consumer Overview Side Effect

SIDE EFFECTS: See also Warning and Precautions sections.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, blurred vision, or tiredness may occur as your body adjusts to the medication. Nausea/vomiting, stomach pain, and unusual dreams may also occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Propranolol may reduce blood flow to your hands and feet, causing them to feel cold. Smoking may worsen this effect. Dress warmly and avoid tobacco use.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

The hydrochlorothiazide in this product may cause a loss of too much body water (dehydration) and salt/minerals. Tell your doctor immediately if you have any of these unlikely but serious symptoms of dehydration or mineral loss: very dry mouth, extreme thirst, muscle cramps, weakness, fast/irregular heartbeat, nausea/vomiting, severe dizziness, confusion, unusual decrease in the amount of urine, fainting, seizures.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: shortness of breath, blue fingers/toes, swelling ankles/feet, mental/mood changes (e.g., depression), numbness/tingling of arms/legs, very slow heartbeat, decreased sexual ability, unexplained/sudden weight gain, increased thirst/urination, decrease in vision, eye pain.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: easy bruising/bleeding, signs of infection (e.g., fever, persistent sore throat), aching/swollen joints, yellowing eyes/skin, persistent nausea/vomiting, severe stomach/abdominal pain, dark urine, unusual change in the amount of urine (not including the normal increase in urine when you first start this drug).

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

 

Read the Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Learn More »

PRECAUTIONS: Before taking this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to propranolol or hydrochlorothiazide; or to other thiazides (e.g., chlorothiazide); or if you have had a serious reaction to other beta blockers (e.g., metoprolol, atenolol); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: breathing problems (e.g., asthma, bronchitis, emphysema), diabetes, heart failure, certain types of heart rhythm problems (sinus bradycardia, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, second- or third-degree atrioventricular block), overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism), kidney disease, liver disease, blood circulation problems (e.g., Raynaud's disease), a certain type of tumor (pheochromocytoma), mental/mood disorders (e.g., depression), certain muscle/nerve disease (myasthenia gravis), gout, loss of too much body water (dehydration), lupus, certain recent nerve surgery (sympathectomy), severe allergic reactions, untreated mineral imbalance (e.g., low potassium/magnesium, high calcium).

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking this medication.

This drug may make you dizzy or cause blurred vision. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Limit alcoholic beverages.

To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position. Significant loss of body water from too much sweating, vomiting, or diarrhea can also lower your blood pressure and worsen dizziness. Drink plenty of fluids to prevent these effects and dehydration. If you are on restricted fluid intake, consult your doctor for further instructions. Contact your doctor if you are unable to drink fluids or if you have persistent diarrhea/vomiting.

This drug may reduce the potassium levels in your blood. Ask your doctor about increasing the amount of potassium in your diet (e.g., bananas, orange juice) or about using a salt substitute containing potassium. A potassium supplement may be prescribed by your doctor.

If you have diabetes, this product may prevent the fast/pounding heartbeat you would usually feel when your blood sugar level falls too low (hypoglycemia). Other symptoms of a low blood sugar level, such as dizziness and sweating, are unaffected by this drug. This product also may make it harder to control your blood sugar levels. Check your blood sugar levels regularly as directed by your doctor. Tell your doctor immediately if you have symptoms of high blood sugar such as increased thirst, hunger, and urination. Your anti-diabetic medication or diet may need to be adjusted.

This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Avoid prolonged sun exposure, tanning booths, and sunlamps. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this product, especially dizziness.

During pregnancy, this product should be used only when clearly needed. Infants exposed to the medications in this product during pregnancy may have low birth weight, low blood sugar, slow breathing/heartbeat, liver problems, or bleeding problems. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

The medications in this product pass into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Consumer Overview Missed Dose

DRUG INTERACTIONS: See also How to Use section.

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: alpha blockers (e.g., prazosin), aluminum hydroxide, anticholinergics (e.g., atropine, scopolamine), calcium channel blockers (e.g., diltiazem, verapamil), chlorpromazine, cisapride, diazepam, diazoxide, dofetilide, drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove propranolol from your body (such as cimetidine, St. John's wort, certain SSRI antidepressants including fluoxetine/paroxetine/fluvoxamine, protease inhibitors including ritonavir, rifamycins including rifabutin, certain anti-seizure medicines including carbamazepine), drugs that can increase dizziness (e.g., narcotic pain relievers such as morphine, barbiturates such as phenobarbital), other drugs to treat high blood pressure (e.g., clonidine, hydralazine, methyldopa, reserpine), epinephrine, fingolimod, haloperidol, other heart medications (e.g., amiodarone, digoxin, disopyramide, propafenone, quinidine), lithium, mefloquine, rizatriptan, theophylline, thioridazine, drugs for thyroid disease (e.g., methimazole, propylthiouracil, thyroid supplements including levothyroxine), warfarin.

Check the labels on all your medicines (e.g., cough-and-cold products, diet aids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-NSAIDs for pain/fever reduction) because they may contain ingredients that could increase your blood pressure or cause a fast heartbeat (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, ibuprofen, naproxen). Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely.

This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including glaucoma screening test, cardiovascular stress testing using arbutamine, parathyroid test, protein-bound iodide test), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

 

OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: very slow heartbeat, severe dizziness, fainting, trouble breathing.

 

NOTES: Do not share this medication with others.

Lifestyle changes such as stress reduction programs, exercise, and dietary changes may increase the effectiveness of this medicine. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about lifestyle changes that might benefit you.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (e.g., liver/kidney function tests, blood mineral levels such as potassium, complete blood counts) should be performed regularly to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

Have your blood pressure and heart rate checked regularly while taking this medication. Learn how to monitor your own blood pressure and heart rate at home, and share the readings with your doctor.

 

MISSED DOSE: If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

 

STORAGE: Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

 

Information last revised March 2014. Copyright(c) 2014 First Databank, Inc.

Patient Detailed Side Effect

Brand Names: Inderide

Generic Name: hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Pronunciation: HYE droe klor oh THYE a zide and proe PRAN oh lol)

  • What is hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?
  • What are the possible side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?
  • What should I discuss with my doctor before taking hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?
  • How should I take hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (Inderide)?
  • What happens if I overdose (Inderide)?
  • What should I avoid while taking hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?
  • What other drugs will affect hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?
  • Where can I get more information?

What is hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?

Hydrochlorothiazide is a thiazide diuretic (water pill) that helps prevent your body from absorbing too much salt, which can cause fluid retention.

Propranolol is a beta-blocker. Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins).

The combination of hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension).

Hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

HCTZ-Propranolol 80 mg-25 mg-MYL

round, white, imprinted with MYLAN 347

What are the possible side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • eye pain, vision problems;
  • swelling, rapid weight gain, feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;
  • fast, slow, or uneven heartbeat;
  • easy bruising or bleeding;
  • numbness or tingly feeling in your hands or feet;
  • feeling weak, drowsy, restless, or light-headed;
  • nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, extreme thirst, headache, confusion, hallucinations, seizure (convulsions);
  • increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle pain or weakness or limp feeling;
  • urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or
  • upper stomach pain, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • diarrhea, constipation, upset stomach;
  • dizziness, spinning sensation;
  • sore throat, body aches;
  • blurred vision;
  • depressed mood; or
  • sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Inderide (propranolol hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

Learn More »

What is the most important information I should know about hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?

You should not use this medication if you have asthma, severe or uncontrolled heart failure, a heart condition called "sick sinus syndrome" or "AV block," or if you are unable to urinate.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure, kidney or liver disease, cirrhosis, glaucoma, bronchospastic lung disease, gout, lupus, diabetes, a thyroid disorder, or if you are allergic to sulfa drugs or penicillin.

If you are diabetic, check your blood sugar carefully. Using propranolol can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar. Your insulin or diabetic medication needs may change while you are taking hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol. Talk with your doctor before changing any doses.

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase your blood levels of propranolol.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink. In some cases, drinking too much liquid can be as unsafe as not drinking enough.

Keep using this medication even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms.

There are many other medicines that can interact with hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use.

Side Effects Centers
  • Inderide

Patient Detailed How Take

What should I discuss with my doctor before taking hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to hydrochlorothiazide or propranolol, or if you have:

  • asthma;
  • severe or uncontrolled heart failure;
  • a heart condition called "sick sinus syndrome" or "AV block" (2nd or 3rd degree); or
  • if you are unable to urinate.

To make sure you can safely take hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • congestive heart failure;
  • kidney disease;
  • liver disease (or cirrhosis);
  • glaucoma;
  • bronchospastic lung disease;
  • a thyroid disorder;
  • lupus;
  • gout;
  • diabetes; or
  • if you are allergic to sulfa drugs or penicillin.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

Hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Do not stop using hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol suddenly, or you could have a serious or life-threatening heart problem. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Your blood and urine may both be tested if you have been vomiting or are dehydrated. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you are diabetic, check your blood sugar carefully. Using propranolol can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar. Your insulin or diabetic medication needs may change while you are taking hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol. Talk with your doctor before changing any doses.

If you need surgery or medical tests, tell the doctor ahead of time that you are taking medication that contains hydrochlorothiazide. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Keep using hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms.

Store this medication in a tightly closed container at room temperature, away from heat and moisture.

Side Effects Centers
  • Inderide

Patient Detailed Avoid Taking

What happens if I miss a dose (Inderide)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose (Inderide)?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include slow heart rate, feeling like you might pass out, trouble breathing, or increased urination.

What should I avoid while taking hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?

Avoid using antacids without your doctor's advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. Antacids contain different medicines and some types can make it harder for your body to absorb hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol.

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase your blood levels of propranolol.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink. In some cases, drinking too much liquid can be as unsafe as not drinking enough.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

What other drugs will affect hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol (Inderide)?

Tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you light-headed (especially narcotic pain medication or barbiturates). They can add to the side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol.

Many drugs can interact with hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

  • chlorpromazine (Thorazine);
  • cimetidine (Tagamet);
  • haloperidol (Haldol);
  • insulin or oral diabetes medication;
  • phenytoin (Dilantin);
  • rifampin (Rifadin, Rifamate, Rimactane);
  • theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Slo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl, and others);
  • steroids (prednisone and others);
  • other blood pressure medications, (especially reserpine);
  • a calcium channel blocker such as amlodipine (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta, Amturnide), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others; or
  • NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Arthrotec, Cambia, Cataflam, Voltaren, Flector Patch, Pennsaid, Solareze), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol.


Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2013 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision date: 3/12/2012.

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