Supplements Details

Cassia Cinnamon

What other names is Cassia Cinnamon known by?

Bastard Cinnamon, Canela de Cassia, Canela Molida, Canelle, Cannelle Bâtarde, Cannelle Cassia, Cannelle de Ceylan, Cannelle de Chine, Cannelle de Cochinchine, Cannelle de Padang, Cannelle de Saigon, Cannelier Casse, Canton Cassia, Casse, Casse Odorante, Cassia, Cassia Aromaticum, Cassia Bark, Cassia Lignea, Chinese Cinnamon, Cinnamomi Cassiae Cortex, Cinnamomum, Cinnamomum aromaticum, Cinnamomum cassia, Cinnamomum ramulus, Cinnamon, Cinnamon Essential Oil, Cinnamon Flos, Cinnamoni Cortex, Cinnamonomi Cortex, Cortex Cinnamomi, Écorce de Cassia, False Cinnamon, Fausse Cannelle, Gui Zhi, Huile Essentielle de Cannelle, Keishi, Laurier des Indes, Nees, Ramulus Cinnamomi, Rou Gui, Sthula Tvak, Taja, Zimbluten.

What is Cassia Cinnamon?

Cassia cinnamon is a plant. People use the bark and flower for medicine.

Possibly Ineffective for...

  • Diabetes.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Loss of appetite, muscle and stomach spasms, bloating, intestinal gas, vomiting, diarrhea, common cold, impotence, bed wetting, menstrual complaints, chest pain, high blood pressure, kidney problems, cancer, and other conditions.

How does Cassia Cinnamon work?

Cassia cinnamon might lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Cassia cinnamon also contains the chemical cinnamaldehyde, which might have activity against bacteria and fungi.

Are there safety concerns?

Cassia cinnamon is safe when used in amounts commonly found in foods and in medicinal doses.

There is some concern that taking large amounts of cassia cinnamon might cause potential serious side effects in some susceptible people. Cassia cinnamon can contain large amounts of a chemical called coumarin. In people who are sensitive, coumarin might cause or worsen liver disease. Large amounts of cassia cinnamon should not be taken for a long period of time. People with liver disease should also avoid taking cassia cinnamon products.

When applied to the skin, cassia cinnamon can sometimes cause skin irritation and allergic skin reactions.

Cassia cinnamon also might DECREASE blood sugar. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar carefully when using cassia cinnamon.

Do not take cassia cinnamon in amounts greater than those typically found in food if:

  • You are pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • You are allergic to cassia cinnamon.
  • You have liver disease.
  • You are scheduled for surgery in the next two weeks.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Medications that can harm the liver (Hepatotoxic drugs)
Interaction Rating: Major Do not take this combination.

Taking very large doses of cassia cinnamon might harm the liver, especially in people with existing liver disease. Taking large amounts of cassia cinnamon along with medications that might also harm the liver might increase the risk of liver damage. Do not take large amounts of cassia cinnamon if you are taking a medication that can harm the liver.

Some medications that can harm the liver include acetaminophen (Tylenol and others), amiodarone (Cordarone), carbamazepine (Tegretol), isoniazid (INH), methotrexate (Rheumatrex), methyldopa (Aldomet), fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), erythromycin (Erythrocin, Ilosone, others), phenytoin (Dilantin), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), and many others.



Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Cassia cinnamon might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking cassia cinnamon along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, metformin (Glucophage), pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Dosing considerations for Cassia Cinnamon.

The appropriate dose of cassia cinnamon depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for cassia cinnamon. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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