Supplements Details

Chromium

What other names is Chromium known by?

Acétate de Chrome, Atomic Number 24, Chlorure Chromique, Chlorure de Chrome, Chrome, Chrome III, Chrome 3+, Chrome FTG, Chrome Facteur de Tolérance au Glucose, Chrome Trivalent, Chromic Chloride, Chromium Acetate, Chromium Chloride, Chromium Nicotinate, Chromium Picolinate, Chromium Polynicotinate, Chromium Proteinate, Chromium Trichloride, Chromium Tripicolinate, Chromium III, Chromium III Picolinate, Chromium 3+, Cr III, Cr3+, Cromo, Glucose Tolerance Factor-Cr, GTF, GTF Chromium, GTF-Cr, Kali Bichromicum, Nicotinate de Chrome, Numéro Atomique 24, Picolinate de Chrome, Picolinate de Chrome III, Polynicotinate de Chrome, Potassium Bichromate, Protéinate de Chrome, Trichlorure de Chrome, Tripicolinate de Chrome, Trivalent Chromium, Cr.

What is Chromium?

Chromium is a metal. It is called an "essential trace element" because very small amounts of chromium are necessary for human health.

Likely Effective for...

  • Preventing chromium deficiency.

Possibly Effective for...

  • Type 2 diabetes.

Possibly Ineffective for...

  • Athletic conditioning.
  • Prediabetes.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Improving athletic performance, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), obesity and weight loss, depression, preventing a heart attack, Turner's syndrome (a genetic disorder that has a high risk of diabetes), polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and other conditions.

How does Chromium work?

Chromium might help keep blood sugar levels normal by improving the way our bodies use insulin.

Are there safety concerns?

Chromium is safe for most adults when used appropriately for 6 months or less. Chromium also seems to be safe for most people when used for longer periods of time. Some people experience side effects such as skin irritation, headaches, dizziness, nausea, mood changes and impaired thinking, judgment, and coordination. High doses have been linked to more serious side effects including blood disorders, liver or kidney damage, and other problems. But it is not known if chromium is the actual cause of these side effects.

Do not take chromium supplements if:

  • You are pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • You have kidney problems.
  • You have a chromate allergy.
  • You have a behavioral or psychiatric condition such as depression, anxiety, or schizophrenia.
  • You have liver disease.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Insulin
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Chromium might decrease blood sugar. Insulin is also used to decrease blood sugar. Taking chromium along with insulin might cause your blood sugar to drop too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your insulin might need to be changed.



Levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid, Levoxyl, and others)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Taking chromium with levothyroxine (Synthroid) might decrease how much levothyroxine (Synthroid) that the body absorbs. This might make levothyroxine (Synthroid) less effective. To help avoid this interaction, levothyroxine (Synthroid) should be taken 30 minutes before or 3-4 hours after taking chromium.



Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Chromium might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking chromium along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, metformin (Glucophage), pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), and others.



Aspirin
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Aspirin might increase how much chromium the body absorbs and increase chromium levels in the blood. In theory, taking aspirin with chromium might increase the risk of adverse effects.



NSAIDs (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

NSAIDs are anti-inflammatory medications used for decreasing pain and swelling. NSAIDs might increase chromium levels in the body and increase the risk of adverse effects. Avoid taking chromium supplements and NSAIDs at the same time.

Some NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), aspirin, and others.

Dosing considerations for Chromium.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For type 2 diabetes:
    • 200-1000 mcg daily in divided doses.
    • A specific combination product providing chromium 600 mcg plus biotin 2 mg daily (Diachrome, Nutrition 21) has also been used.

The safe and tolerable upper intake levels of chromium are not known. However, daily adequate intake (AI) levels for chromium have been established: Infants 0 to 6 months, 0.2 mcg; 7 to 12 months, 5.5 mcg; children 1 to 3 years, 11 mcg; 4 to 8 years, 15 mcg; boys 9 to 13 years, 25 mcg; men 14 to 50 years, 35 mcg; men 51 and older, 30 mcg; girls 9 to 13 years, 21 mcg; 14 to 18 years, 24 mcg; women 19 to 50 years, 25 mcg; women 51 and older, 20 mcg; pregnant women 14 to 18 years, 29 mcg; 19 to 50 years, 30 mcg; lactating women 14 to 18 years, 44 mcg; 19 to 50 years, 45 mcg.

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