Supplements Details

Ginger

What other names is Ginger known by?

African Ginger, Amomum Zingiber, Ardraka, Black Ginger, Cochin Ginger, Gan Jiang, Gingembre, Gingembre Africain, Gingembre Cochin, Gingembre Indien, Gingembre Jamaïquain, Gingembre Noir, Ginger Essential Oil, Ginger Root, Huile Essentielle de Gingembre, Imber, Indian Ginger, Jamaica Ginger, Jengibre, Jiang, Kankyo, Kanshokyo, Nagara, Race Ginger, Racine de Gingembre, Rhizoma Zingiberi, Rhizoma Zingiberis, Rhizoma Zingiberis Recens, Shen Jiang, Sheng Jiang, Shoga, Shokyo, Shunthi, Srungavera, Sunth, Sunthi, Vishvabheshaja, Zingiber Officinale, Zingiberis Rhizoma, Zingiberis Siccatum Rhizoma, Zinzeberis, Zinziber Officinale, Zinziber Officinalis.

What is Ginger?

Ginger is an herb. The rhizome (underground stem) is used to make medicine.

Is Ginger effective?

There is some scientific evidence that ginger can prevent motion sickness and seasickness.

Ginger might also help prevent morning sickness, but it should not be used for this purpose. The safety of ginger in pregnancy has not been proven.

There is also evidence that ginger can relieve joint pain and help movement in people who have rheumatoid arthritis. But ginger doesn't seem to be helpful for people with another kind of arthritis called osteoarthritis.

There isn't enough information to know if ginger is effective for the other conditions people use it for including: upset stomach, loss of appetite, colds, flu, and others.

Possibly Effective for...

  • Nausea and vomiting following surgery.
  • Preventing dizziness.
  • Preventing morning sickness, after discussing the possible risks with your healthcare provider.

Possibly Ineffective for...

  • Preventing motion sickness and seasickness.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, loss of appetite, colds, flu, migraine headache, preventing nausea caused by chemotherapy, and other conditions.

How does Ginger work?

Ginger contains chemicals that may reduce nausea and inflammation.

Are there safety concerns?

Ginger is safe for most people. Some people can have mild side effects including heartburn, diarrhea, and general stomach discomfort. When ginger is applied to the skin, it may cause irritation.

Do not take ginger if:

  • You are pregnant or breast-feeding, unless prescribed by your healthcare provider.
  • You have a bleeding disorder.
  • You have diabetes.
  • You have a heart condition.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Nifedipine
Interaction Rating: Major Do not take this combination.

Taking ginger along with nifedipne might slow blood clotting and increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.



Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Ginger might slow blood clotting. Taking ginger along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.



Phenprocoumon
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Phenprocoumon is used in Europe to slow blood clotting. Ginger can also slow blood clotting. Taking ginger along with phenprocoumon might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your phenprocoumon might need to be changed.



Warfarin (Coumadin)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. Ginger can also slow blood clotting. Taking ginger along with warfarin (Coumadin) might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.



Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Ginger might increase how much cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) the body absorbs. Taking ginger along with cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) might increase the side effects of cyclosporine.



Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Ginger might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking ginger along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, metformin (Glucophage), pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), and others.



Medications for high blood pressure (Calcium channel blockers)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Ginger might reduce blood pressure in a way that is similar to some medications for blood pressure and heart disease. Taking ginger along with these medications might cause your blood pressure to drop too low or cause an irregular heartbeat.

Some medications for high blood pressure and heart disease include nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan), diltiazem (Cardizem), isradipine (DynaCirc), felodipine (Plendil), amlodipine (Norvasc), and others.



Metronidazole (Flagyl)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Ginger can increase how much metronidazole (Flagyl) the body absorbs. Taking ginger along with metronidazole (Flagyl) might increase the side effects of metronidazole.

Dosing considerations for Ginger.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For morning sickness: 250 mg ginger 4 times daily.
  • For postoperative nausea and vomiting: 1-2 grams powdered ginger root one hour before induction of anesthesia.
  • For arthritis: Many different ginger extract products have been used in studies. The dosing used differs depending on the product taken. One ginger extract (Eurovita Extract 33; EV ext-33) 170 mg three times daily has been used. Another extract (Eurovita Extract 77; EV ext-77), which combines a gingert with an alpinia, 255 mg twice daily has also been used. Another ginger extract (Zintona EC) 250 mg four times daily has also been used.

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